Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Wave upon Wave

This week, the daily numbers of new confirmed cases of COVID-19 hit new highs at over 885,000, led by India which registered over 330,000 cases on April 22 alone, the highest for any single country since the pandemic started. Will this new surge derail the impending global recovery? And what will be the impact on markets?

With the recent rise in infections, the world has now registered 145.4m cases of the coronavirus, leading to 3.1m deaths. 123.7m people have recovered from the virus leaving 18.6m active cases, of which 110,000 are currently considered critical. Over the past 7 days, the world has counted 5.6m new cases, a 9% increase from the preceding 7-day period. However, the increase is dominated by India – a 60% rise to a 7-day total of 2.0m. Of the other top 10 countries, only Argentina and Colombia have seen significant increases (+8% and +7% respectively) while the US, Brazil, France and Italy all registered weekly declines in new cases of between 11 and 13%.

Of course, India’s figures should be put it context – with 1.39bn inhabitants, it ranks second behind China in terms of population size and has a much less centralised and authoritarian central government. Moreover, India holds large numbers of mass gatherings, including Kumbh Mela – the world’s biggest religious assembly – which saw up to 3m Hindus take a ritual dip in the Ganges on April 14. However, India’s case numbers look less dramatic when compared to its population size – over the past 7 days, it has registered 1,416 cases and 9 deaths per 1m inhabitants while third-ranked Turkey has seen 4,872 cases and 27 deaths.

Since the start of the pandemic, treatment protocols have improved, meaning that fewer patients now require intensive care and that death rates have declined. Over the first 21 days of April 2020, the world counted a total of 1.6m new cases and 133,700 deaths. Over the same period this year, the totals are 14.7m and 239,500 respectively. Of course, new case numbers have risen as testing has become more widespread but fatality numbers have not followed suit – the current 7-day average daily death total at 12,196 is still below January’s 14,462 high.

Rapid progress in vaccination programmes has raised hopes that the pandemic could be brought under control. Indeed, this appears to be the case already in countries like Israel and the UK. Israel has now delivered 120 jabs for every 100 inhabitants and has seen average new case totals tumble from 8,395 in mid-January to 157 this week while average daily deaths are down from 65 to 5. In the UK, 66 inoculations have been delivered per 100 inhabitants, enabling average case and fatality totals to fall from January’s highs of 59,591 and 1,250 to 2,493 and 22 respectively.

In the European Union, vaccination programmes got off to a slow start but improved availability of doses has enabled countries to accelerate inoculations. Germany, France, Italy and Spain have given 4.1 vaccinations per 100 inhabitants over the past 7 days, just behind the UK’s current 5.1 rate. Moreover, the EU has exercised an option to get an additional 100m doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, just as the first deliveries of Johnson & Johnson’s serum are getting underway.

In India however, the vaccination programme has proved inadequate so far. Although the country ranks third in total vaccinations behind China and the US, it has only delivered 9.4 jabs for every 100 inhabitants and progress is woefully slow – only 1.1 inoculations per 100 over the past 7 days. As one of the world’s leading vaccine producers, India will have to step up its ordering dramatically if it is to reduce the strain on its healthcare system.

Bottom line. Despite the recent rise in cases, we do not believe that India’s crisis has the potential to derail global recovery – the country is much less embedded in global supply chains than China, where we expect growth to accelerate this year to over 8%. In light of strong performance over the past 12 months and somewhat stretched valuations, we recently decided to lock in some profits on global equities although we retain an Overweight stance, given the supportive cyclical backdrop.

Read full article​​​​​​​

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking