Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - On Tenterhooks

In our recent Market Update on the US elections (see The Final Countdown), we outlined a scenario which may well be playing out – a narrow Biden victory with the Republicans retaining majority control of the Senate. This stands in stark contrast to the preelection consensus from opinion pollsters and online prediction markets which foresaw a blue (i.e, Democratic) wave sweeping Congress and the White House. With those expectations dashed, what is the outlook for the US economy and markets?

At the time of writing, the actual outcome remains deeply uncertain. In five states,the race could go either way. And the President has already called for a recount in Wisconsin where Biden leads by only 49.4% to 48.8% with over 98% of votes counted. And further challenges are likely, for example in Pennsylvania and Georgia where the current gaps between the two are only 5,597 votes and 1,097 respectively. The uncertainty could last weeks – the deadline for conclusion of any legal challenges and selection of electors by each State is December 8 and the formal vote by the electoral college will be held on December 14.

In the weeks running up to the election, the perceived probability of a blue wave saw investors focus on the impact of Biden’s massive $2 trillion 4-year investment plan. This was expected to boost long-term growth but also to spark higher inflation, encouraging “reflation trades” on higher bond yields (see chart) and a swing to more cyclical sectors. Between early August and election day, the S&P Industrials index gained 11.9% versus 2.5% for Technology. Curiously, US stocks rallied by 3.0% on Monday and Tuesday on blue wave hopes and then by a further 4.2% on Wednesday and Thursday as those hopes were disappointed!

If we are correct in judging that Joe Biden will indeed be inaugurated as President with the Senate remaining under Republican control, the new administration could find itself stymied. As we wrote in the Market Update, this scenario “would make policy implementation difficult, keeping Trump’s tax cuts in place. Such a period of stalemate would not be bad for markets, but it could hamper plans of near-term fiscal stimulus”. This would mean no long-term improvement in US growth potential, although we still expect the worsening pandemic to trigger bipartisan support for a new stimulus package in coming months.

The President does have more room for manoeuvre in areas like foreign policy, suggesting a less confrontational stance with allies like the EU and Japan in order to build a coalition to keep pressure on China. Joe Biden has also promised to rejoin the Paris climate agreement on becoming President, which could provide an incentive to boost US research & development of green technologies. Biden would also be likely to adopt a more constructive approach to engagement with multilateral institutions like the United Nations, the World Trade Organisation and so on.

On Thursday, we had the latest central bank policy meetings in Washington and London. The Federal Reserve (Fed) left policy unchanged as expected – key rates remain at 0-0.25% and the Fed will continue bond purchases at around $120bn per month. Chair Jerome Powell also reiterated his call for more fiscal support for the economy. The surprise came from the Bank of England – rates were left at 0.1% but asset purchases were boosted by £150bn rather than the expected £50-100bn. This reflects the central bank’s worries about the COVID-19 induced drop in consumer spending and expectations that hold-ups for exports at the border will slow recovery after Brexit becomes effective next year.

Bottom line. Looking ahead, we expect that overindebtedness and high unemployment will keep inflation low and key US rates close to zero with Fed purchases capping upside pressure on Treasury yields. As post-election uncertainty fades, we expect safehaven flows into dollars to ebb, with the euro resuming its recovery in 2021. Regarding equity markets, policy gridlock has often proved quite supportive given that it provides great visibility to investors and businesses alike. Moreover, fiscal and monetary policy are set to remain supportive for years to come.

Read full article​​​​​​​

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking