Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Let's talk about tax

In last week’s Weekly Update, we described President Biden’s massive push towards fiscal stimulus, the $2.26 trillion American Jobs Plan. Unlike the American Rescue Plan – the $1.9 tn bill he signed in March to provide pandemic relief to households and small businesses – this plan will not be financed by borrowing but rather by increased taxes. Will the added tax burden slow the recovery? And what does all this mean for markets?

To pay for the American Jobs Plan, the Administration intends to increase the tax burden on US companies. This was to be expected – Joe Biden’s electoral platform included a partial repeal of Donald Trump’s massive 2017 tax cuts, which reduced statutory corporate tax rates from 35% to 21%. The President now wants to increase the rate to 28% which should raise enough revenue over the next 10 years to pay for just under half of the stimulus plan. The remainder of the amounts required will be raised by taxing a larger proportion of US companies’ overseas profits. The Trump administration introduced a tax on global intangible low-taxed income (GILTI) in December 2017, set at half the 21% statutory rate, i.e. 10.5%. Biden now plans to double the GILTI tax to 21%, to eliminate certain deductions for foreign income and to establish a new minimum tax on large companies’ book income. According to a study by the Penn Wharton Budget Model, these measures in aggregate should raise $2.1 tn over the next 10 years.

However, this proposal would mean a sharp increase in costs for US-based multinationals, raising the risk that companies might seek new domiciles in lower-tax jurisdictions. It is no surprise therefore that US Treasury Secretary Yellen has signalled this week her willingness to accelerate talks on a global minimum tax rate. These discussions have been coordinated by the OECD in recent years and have included proposals for a digital services tax (DST), which would enable governments to tax revenues and profits generated by technology and internet companies with no physical presence in the country. The DST proposal was fiercely resisted by the Trump Administration, which viewed it as blatant discrimination against US digital leaders – the US reacted with a “safe harbour” measure, allowing US companies to opt out of compliance with the DST.

Janet Yellen’s shift in stance marks a return to multilateral engagement with international institutions, in contrast to Trump’s strict “America First” doctrine. She has proposed that the global minimum tax be set at 21% and signalled that the US would abandon the safe harbour policy. While this shift will be welcomed by the European Union, which has been advocating both a global minimum rate and a DST, it is by no means certain that a quick agreement can be reached.

First, the OECD’s discussions have revolved around a 12.5% minimum rate. An increase to 21% will likely be resisted by countries like Ireland which have successfully used their low tax regimes to attract inward investment and jobs. Second, countries have very different needs for tax revenue. According to the OECD, government expenditure as a percentage of GDP varies widely, ranging from 24.5% in Ireland to 38.1% in the US to 55.6% in France. Third, there is sure to be strong opposition from Republicans and some moderate Democrats in Congress to Biden’s tax proposals. Biden cannot afford to lose more than 3 Democratic votes in the House and none in the Senate if he is to get the legislation through. Finally, the Biden White House has not given up on punitive tariffs – the US Trade Representative still plans up to 25% tariffs on some imports from 6 countries – including Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom – which have introduced DST legislation.

Bottom line. Rapid rises in global corporate taxes are unlikely and President Biden may be forced to compromise on his planned increases. This means that budget deficits are likely to remain under pressure, encouraging central banks to maintain easy monetary policy settings. Regarding equities, 2017 showed that changes in the tax code do not have a lasting impact on stock market performance – our preferences for cyclically-sensitive sectors and markets and Value stocks remain unchanged.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking