Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Still in the tunnel

On Monday November 9, the announcement by BioNTech and Pfizer of the preliminary results of their trials of a COVID-19 vaccine sparked a massive shift in financial markets (see Light at the End of the Tunnel). European equity markets rallied sharply, outperforming the US as technology stocks lagged cyclicals. Oil prices jumped on hopes of growth normalisation which in turn put selling pressure on long-dated government bonds. What does all this mean for the global economy and markets?

This week’s announcement is clearly very encouraging. The partners’ vaccine has been tested on over 43,500 participants in phase 3 trials – the last phase before approval by health authorities – of whom 94 tested positive for COVID-19. Over 90% of the confirmed cases had received the placebo rather than the vaccine, suggesting an extremely high level of effectiveness – influenza vaccines are typically much less successful (see left-hand chart).

Moderna, another biotechnology company, also announced it will shortly commence interim analysis of data from phase 3 trials covering 30,000 people with over 53 confirmed cases. Hopes are high that this trial will also be successful given that the vaccine uses the same messenger RiboNucleic Acid (mRNA) technology as BioNTech’s. Moreover, there are other mRNA candidates in the pipeline from Germany’s CureVac and the Imperial College London. Among their advantages, mRNA vaccines are potentially faster to develop and easier to produce than traditional vaccines.

Of course, this does not mean that a vaccine will be available any time soon. The trials must be completed, and applications for approval lodged with the health authorities. Also, production will have to be ramped up – Pfizer and BioNTech estimate that they can have 50 million doses available by year-end and another 1.3 billion next year (and two doses are necessary for the vaccine to be effective). However, it has been estimated that global demand for vaccines could reach 10 to 15 billion doses. Moreover, BioNTech’s vaccine must be stored and shipped at ultra-low temperatures – approximately minus 75 degrees Celsius – which adds logistical complexity to supply chains.

All this means that governments are likely to be forced to keep restrictions and lockdowns in place for some time to come. Healthcare systems are already under pressure, with hospitalisation rates above or approaching April’s highs across Europe and the United States. Business confidence has dipped into contraction territory across continental Europe, driven by the slump in services, which are most directly hit by lockdowns. This means that much of Europe will slip back into recession in Q4, with meaningful recovery only likely towards the end of the winter season in the Northern Hemisphere.

The European Commission recently updated its economic forecasts for the European Union. 2020 will see the deepest recession in its history with the economy contracting by -7.4% over 2019, unchanged from the commission’s previous forecast. However, the recovery next year is likely to be slower than previously thought – up +4.1% rather than the +6.1% expansion it forecast in May. Importantly, this hinges on growth picking up in early 2021, which is by no means certain given the healthcare crisis.

However, this week’s announcement has brightened the longer-term outlook. The vaccines are likely to be reserved initially for healthcare professionals and the most vulnerable – the elderly, the obese etc. – which should relieve pressure on the health systems while vaccination begins for the broader population. Of course, many people may refuse vaccination, at least initially, but if compliance rates are sufficient – say above 40% – we should be able to look forward to some normalisation of economic activity from summer 2021.

Bottom line. The next few months are likely to prove challenging for businesses, depressing profitability and putting pressure on heavily indebted companies, especially in services. This means we should expect further bouts of volatility. However, the improved outlook from next spring will enable corporate management to begin to plan for the longer term. Financial markets tend to look forward and this welcome shift in prospects will help limit downside for risk assets in coming months.

Read full article​​​​​​​

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking