Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - A chilly Winter ahead

In recent days, IHS Markit has published the results of its monthly business confidence surveys, the Purchasing Managers Indices (PMIs). These have come as the second wave of coronavirus infections in Europe – and the third in the US – appears to have crested, and investors are looking forward to mass vaccination programmes in 2021. What will all this mean for economies and markets over the next year?

As shown on the left-hand chart below, daily numbers of new COVID-19 cases have begun to ease lower in Europe but still remain above the highs registered last spring. The scale of the pandemic has put severe pressure on the health system, forcing governments to reinstate lockdowns, which appear to be achieving their aim. In the US on the other hand, the number of new cases continues to hit new highs – with almost 38 cases per 10,000 inhabitants over the last seven days, the US has been hit harder than other countries (Germany and France are at 16 and 11 per 10,000 respectively).

The lockdowns have depressed business confidence across Europe. The composite PMI for the euro zone in November fell almost 5 points to 45.3 (50 points marks the dividing line between expansion and contraction of activity). This masks sharp divergence between countries and sectors. For example, the composite PMI for Germany remains in expansion territory at 51.7 points while France’s plummeted to 40.6. Moreover, the euro zone’s manufacturing PMI for November was 53.8 while confidence in services ( the bulk of GDP in advanced economies) tumbled to 41.7.

The divergence between industry and services is quite logical, given that lockdowns tend to target service activities such as retail or hospitality. The divergence between France and Germany is rather more surprising – weaker confidence in services can be explained by France’s more draconian restrictions, but the decline in the manufacturing PMI there stands in stark contrast to resilience in Germany. Moreover, actual industrial output has actually been stronger in France than in Germany this year as illustrated by the right-hand chart. The explanation may lie in Germany’s heavy dependence on Asian demand – the prospect of a less confrontational Biden administration on trade tariffs would be good news for German exporters. Future output data will show if their confidence is misplaced.

In the US, the lockdowns have been less severe and business confidence remains robust in both manufacturing and services. Indeed, the composite PMI reached its highest point in the last three years at 58.6 points. There are, however, some signs of difficult trading conditions – there have been 740,000 new weekly jobless claims on average over the past month, well above the pre-coronavirus record of 695’000 in 1984.

China on the other hand continues to power ahead. Industrial production expanded 6.9% year-on-year (YoY) in October, in line with the average pace of growth in the pre-pandemic years, while retail sales are recovering strongly (+4.3% YoY in October). Moreover, November’s composite PMI came out at 55.7 points, the highest level since March 2012. According to the International Monetary Fund’s latest World Economic Outlook, China is the only major economy expected to generate growth this year (+1.9%). And next year should see further outperformance, +8.2% versus the global average of +5.2%.

Bottom line. With many European countries preparing to ease restrictions in the runup to year-end, we cannot rule out the possibility of further waves of COVID-19 infections before the vaccination programmes can help populations build up sufficient levels of immunity. However, the vaccines should thereafter enable households and businesses to resume more normal levels of activity. We expect financial markets to continue to look beyond today’s double-dip recession in Europe and towards a cyclical recovery in H2 2021.

Read full article​​​​​​​

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking