Private clients Financial intermediaries

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Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France: +33 (0)1 53 43 87 00 (9am - 6pm)
Luxembourg: +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 5:30pm)
Monaco: +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland: Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact us about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address: protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Luxembourg by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

For customers residing in Italy, please contact BDO, the external provider in charge of Data Protection, by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice-branch-IT@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address: list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

Societe Generale Private Banking aims to provide you with the best possible quality of service. However, difficulties may sometimes arise in the operation of your account or in the use of the services made available to you.

Your private banker  is your privileged contact to receive and process your claim.

 If you disagree with or do not get a response from your advisor, you can send your claim to the direction  of Societe Generale Private Banking France by email to the following address: FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to: 

Société Générale Private Banking France
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

Societe Generale Private Banking France undertakes to acknowledge receipt of your claim within 10 (ten) working days from the date of its receipt and to provide you with a response within 2 (two) months from the same date. If we are unable to meet this 2 (two) month deadline, you will be informed by letter.

In the event of disagreement with the bank  or of a lack of response from us within 2 (two) months of sending your first written claim, or within 15 (fifteen) working days for a claim about a payment service, you may refer the matter free of charge, depending on the nature of your claim, to:  

 

The Consumer Ombudsman at the FBF

The Consumer Ombudsman at the Fédération Bancaire Française (FBF – French Banking Federation) is competent for disputes relating to services provided and contracts concluded in the field of banking operations (e.g. management of deposit accounts, credit operations, payment services etc.), investment services, financial instruments and savings products, as well as the marketing of insurance contracts.

The FBF Ombudsman will reply directly to you within 90 (ninety) days from the date on which she/he receives all the documents on which the request is based. In the event of a complex dispute, this period may be extended. The FBF Ombudsman will formulate a reasoned position and submit it to both parties for approval.

The FBF Ombudsman can be contacted on the following website: www.lemediateur.fbf.fr or by mail at:

Le Médiateur CS 151

75 422 Paris cedex 09

 

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF - French Financial Markets Authority) is also competent for disputes relating to investment services, financial instruments and financial savings products.

For this type of dispute, as a consumer customer, you have therefore a choice between the FBF Ombudsman and the AMF Ombudsman. Once you have chosen one of these two ombudsmen, you can no longer refer the same dispute to the other ombudsman.

The AMF Ombudsman can be contacted on the AMF website: www.amf-france.org or by mail at:

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financiers
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

The Insurance Ombudsman is competent for disputes concerning the application or interpretation of insurance contracts.

The Insurance Ombudsman can be contacted using the contact details that must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Luxembourg should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

Or by email to clienteleprivee.sglux@socgen.com and for customers residing in Italy at societegenerale@unapec.it

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 working days and provide a response to your claim within 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following:

Initially, you may wish to contact the Societe Generale Luxembourg Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Luxembourg
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Luxembourg's supervisory authority, the “Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier”/“CSSF” (Luxembourg Financial Sector Supervisory Commission):

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By email:
direction@cssf.lu

Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 working days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within a maximum of 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Secrétariat Général
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to:

sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
 

Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman: 

www.bankingombudsman.ch

 

Weekly Update - Biden his time

Next Monday December 14 will see the US electoral college cast its votes, ahead of Congress validating the election of the new president on January 6. Joe Biden’s victory is of course still contested by Donald Trump who has yet to concede defeat. He has however authorised the funds for Biden to begin work on the transition, including building his administration’s team. Absent a
major shock, Biden will be inaugurated on January 20, ushering in a dramatic shift in many US policies. Who are the key proposed appointees and what would their policies mean for the economy and markets?

Economy The appointment of Janet Yellen to replace Steven Mnuchin at the Treasury lends weight to our conviction that the Biden White House will pursue expansionary economic policies. She is of course best known for her four years at the head of the Federal Reserve (Fed) before President Trump replaced her with Jerome Powell. During her time at the central bank, she gained a reputation as a “dove”, despite having overseen the start of normalisation of monetary policy from December 2015 onwards. Before chairing the Fed, her career spanned academia (specialising in labour market economics) and public services (as Chair of Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisors and as deputy to Fed Chair Ben Bernanke before his departure). Ms Yellen’s focus on employment will be of particular importance to economic policy. During her time at the Fed, she pushed for less focus on the headline unemployment rate and more emphasis on labour market exclusion and participation rates. This approach dovetails with Mr Powell’s new focus on “maximum employment” (see our September 4 Weekly Update) and seems particularly apposite at present. Last week’s November non-farm payroll data showed that job creation had slowed well below forecasts, while weekly initial claims for unemployment benefits shot higher yesterday, as did the number of continuing claims.

Trade Mr Biden is likely to appoint Katherine Tai as US trade representative, replacing Robert Lighthizer whose anti-China views were well known before he was appointed by President Trump. Ms Tai is viewed as more diplomatic, having already worked at the USTR office on China trade supervision. As highlighted in our US election Market Update, the future Biden administration is likely to hold a strict line on China but seek to rebuild relations with US allies in Europe and Japan with a view to putting collective pressure on Beijing. This being said, Mr Biden has made clear that domestic investment will have priority over new trade deals. He plans to direct $400bn in federal procurement spending to domestic companies and invest heavily in workforce retrainin and new technologies, from artificial intelligence to electric vehicles. This domestic focus means that the current US-EU trade dispute over aircraft subsidies may drag on. In October 2019, the World Trade Organisation (WTO) ruled that the EU had granted illegal state aid to Airbus and authorised the imposition of $7.5bn of US tariffs on EU exports of foodstuffs and aircraft. A year later, the WTO then ruled that the US had unlawfully aided Boeing and gave the green light to $4bn of EU tariffs on US goods.

Bottom line. Negotiations on a new fiscal stimulus package continue, but with no guarantee that the current $908bn deal will be approved by Congress before Inauguration Day. However, we expect the new Biden administration to usher in more expansionary policies under Janet Yellen’s evidence-driven consensus-building, boosting the mid-term outlook for growth. Regarding trade, we expect a change in style but little difference in substance given Biden’s focus on domestic investment. The overall policy mix should be favourable to stocks, in particular those which stand to gain most from a cyclical recovery. Weaker government finances, on the other hand, could put further downward pressure on the US dollar.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking