Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

January's good resolutions are marked by behavioural biases at work in behavioural finance

January's good resolutions are an opportunity to draw parallels with behavioural finance.

The month of January is traditionally marked by the exchange of good wishes and, for some, by the making of good resolutions for the new calendar year. This is an opportunity to focus on two key elements to draw parallels with behavioural finance: the essence of resolutions and how they relate to the month of January.

Resolutions: you won't necessarily hold them up…

The many resolutions made at the beginning of the year are not always kept... If you plead guilty, rest assured, you are not a unique case! Indeed, researchers at the University of Scranton have estimated that 45% of Americans make resolutions but only 46% of them will keep them for six months... and 8% until the end of the year(1). However, year after year, while the nature of resolutions may change, they are still present in conversations at the beginning of the year. How do we analyze these January wishes and what do they tell us about managing personal finances? First of all, they reflect more than simple voluntarism: strong optimism on the part of individuals, sometimes even if it means joining the "magical thinking" (see our article on behavioural biases from Friday the 13th). What can we say about a non-sportsman who decides to do one hour of sport a day, about a smoker with a high level of consumption who claims to reduce it by half? Some researchers call "false hope syndrome" these unrealistic and incoherent resolutions with the view of oneself.

... but they will help you understand how to manage your personal finances!

A study by the University of Bristol(2) found that while 88% of January resolutions were not kept throughout the year, 52% of individuals were initially confident that they would be successful. The magnitude of these differences reflects a very common over-confidence bias among individuals. These overconfidence and optimism biases can be found in the management of personal finances. For example, one can contrast this with a denial attitude when faced with an investment that has gone wrong: "the information is not so negative", "the stock will go up" ... Some of the resolutions stem from a need to mimic a strong social pressure: although little paid in intentions at the beginning of the year, an individual will be influenced by his personal and/or professional entourage who will claim to have made decisions for the year ahead. The notion of mimicry can be found in the various effects of investment fashions: trendy assets, fashionable investment sector, types of funds prized by investors. This danger lurks in the case of an investor who is too susceptible to influence. Finally, once the decision to change has been taken, the individual is confronted with a commitment bias: subscribing to a gymnastics club results in a feeling of commitment such that not going there is guilt-ridden! If this feeling of commitment can be positive, it can also be harmful for the management of personal finances: stubbornness, sometimes out of simple pride, in a financial investment that is not very profitable joins this bias of commitment.

If you missed the fateful date, it's not too late!

In addition to the relevance of the resolutions, their systematic attachment to the month of January is interesting. First of all, because this starting point does not necessarily make much sense: January, in the depths of winter, is not a good time to start something new. Shorter days and less pleasant weather conditions take away the dynamism...  and therefore the motivation for change. A resolution taken in April would therefore make more sense, but it comes up against our perpetual anchoring in January. This strong anchoring is reminiscent of the calculations of the historical financial performance of investments (shares, funds, etc.) which are systematically based on the calendar year. However, when making an investment decision in June, is it relevant to look at the comparison of performance -which, it should be remembered, is not an indicator of future performance - over the last two or three calendar years?  Wouldn't it be better to look at performance over a few months of sharp falls or rises in the financial markets?

Bad news: having missed the 1st of January is unfortunately not a valid excuse for not making good resolutions; even if the statistics tell us that you won't necessarily make them!

 


(1)Study conducted by John C. Norcross in 1989 : https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0306460389900506?via%3Dihub

(2) 2007 study conducted by Richard Wiseman : http://www.richardwiseman.quirkology/new/USA/Experiment 2 resolution.shtmlg

This document is not intended to provide an investment service and does not constitute investment advice or a personalised recommendation on a financial product, nor a solicitation of any kind, nor legal, accounting or tax advice from Societe Generale Private Banking.

No entity within Societe Generale Private Banking can be held liable for any decision taken by an investor based solely on the information contained in this document.

Édouard Camblain Head of strategic projects & development