Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Friday 13th win: illustration of "magical thinking", a classic bias in behavioural finance

The rush to gamble on this particular day reflects above all a tendency to "magical thinking", a well-known bias in behavioural finance.

Behavioural finance is defined by the application of psychology to finance: it differs from classical financial theory by considering individuals not as purely rational beings, but as being influenced by their emotions or by reasoning biases.

Who will win between the lottery and Spirou?

Friday the 13th is always awaited with some impatience by the Française des Jeux (French lottery operator). And for good reason!  It sees the number of lottery players almost double and the number of bets in scratch games increase by about 20%. Although this phenomenon repeats itself every Friday 13th, it does not seem rational for all that.  For example, considering that an individual has statistically as much chance of winning on Friday the 13th as any other day of the year, it is difficult to see the logic behind this phenomenon other than to attribute it to emotional reactions.  This rush to gamble on this particular day reflects above all a tendency to "magical thinking", a well-known bias in Behavioral Finance.

This bias is defined as the belief that one can influence the course of events, in particular through false cause-and-effect relationships: "I'm gambling on Friday the 13th, I have a better chance of winning! ». This tendency, which is particularly evident in gambling, was studied by Ellen Langer ("The illusion of control", 1975) with the following empirical conclusions: a player who is free to choose his or her lottery ticket (and therefore his or her number) bet on average four times more than when the ticket is imposed on him or her.  Moreover, only 63% of players were willing to give up the freely chosen ticket, compared with 81% of those who had been given a number imposed on them. Finally, the resale price of this ticket was four times higher when the ticket (and therefore the number) had been chosen by its holder! Generally speaking, the number 13 does not leave one indifferent: absence of room 13 in some hospitals, absence of thirteenth floor in some towers ...  On the contrary, the Spirou comic magazine is known for its page "12 bis" aiming to ... make a mockery of this superstition!

Back to childhood.. to the detriment of financial performance!

In fact, it is between the ages of five and seven that human beings are most sensitive to magical thoughts! But on the other hand, when we reach tBack to childhood.. to the detriment of financial performance!he age of managing our personal finances, this tendency unfortunately leads us to a denial of reality! If it is not enough to cheer on a sportsman behind the television to see him win, it is not enough to yearn for a sharp rise in the value of an investment to see it magically appreciate. In concrete terms, the refusal to sell a financial asset that is undervalued and has no potential for rebounding is undoubtedly one of the main negative consequences of this bias on the management of personal finances. Victims of this trend, some individuals may also be led to make unfortunate investment decisions, based mainly on irrational expectations of gains. More generally, magical thinking delights those who seek to exploit credulity, for example by presenting "miracle" products, whether financial or not.

The wish to be read all the way to the end has come true - probably by dint of saying it! - it remains to wish everyone good luck for the next Friday 13th!

Édouard Camblain Head of strategic projects & development