Private clients Financial intermediaries

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Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France: +33 (0)1 53 43 87 00 (9am - 6pm)
Luxembourg: +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 5:30pm)
Monaco: +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland: Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact us about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address: protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Luxembourg by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

For customers residing in Italy, please contact BDO, the external provider in charge of Data Protection, by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice-branch-IT@socgen.com

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address: list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

Societe Generale Private Banking aims to provide you with the best possible quality of service. However, difficulties may sometimes arise in the operation of your account or in the use of the services made available to you.

Your private banker  is your privileged contact to receive and process your claim.

 If you disagree with or do not get a response from your advisor, you can send your claim to the direction  of Societe Generale Private Banking France by email to the following address: FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to: 

Société Générale Private Banking France
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

Societe Generale Private Banking France undertakes to acknowledge receipt of your claim within 10 (ten) working days from the date of its receipt and to provide you with a response within 2 (two) months from the same date. If we are unable to meet this 2 (two) month deadline, you will be informed by letter.

In the event of disagreement with the bank  or of a lack of response from us within 2 (two) months of sending your first written claim, or within 15 (fifteen) working days for a claim about a payment service, you may refer the matter free of charge, depending on the nature of your claim, to:  

 

The Consumer Ombudsman at the FBF

The Consumer Ombudsman at the Fédération Bancaire Française (FBF – French Banking Federation) is competent for disputes relating to services provided and contracts concluded in the field of banking operations (e.g. management of deposit accounts, credit operations, payment services etc.), investment services, financial instruments and savings products, as well as the marketing of insurance contracts.

The FBF Ombudsman will reply directly to you within 90 (ninety) days from the date on which she/he receives all the documents on which the request is based. In the event of a complex dispute, this period may be extended. The FBF Ombudsman will formulate a reasoned position and submit it to both parties for approval.

The FBF Ombudsman can be contacted on the following website: www.lemediateur.fbf.fr or by mail at:

Le Médiateur CS 151

75 422 Paris cedex 09

 

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF - French Financial Markets Authority) is also competent for disputes relating to investment services, financial instruments and financial savings products.

For this type of dispute, as a consumer customer, you have therefore a choice between the FBF Ombudsman and the AMF Ombudsman. Once you have chosen one of these two ombudsmen, you can no longer refer the same dispute to the other ombudsman.

The AMF Ombudsman can be contacted on the AMF website: www.amf-france.org or by mail at:

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financiers
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

The Insurance Ombudsman is competent for disputes concerning the application or interpretation of insurance contracts.

The Insurance Ombudsman can be contacted using the contact details that must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Luxembourg should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

Or by email to clienteleprivee.sglux@socgen.com and for customers residing in Italy at societegenerale@unapec.it

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 working days and provide a response to your claim within 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following:

Initially, you may wish to contact the Societe Generale Luxembourg Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Luxembourg
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Luxembourg's supervisory authority, the “Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier”/“CSSF” (Luxembourg Financial Sector Supervisory Commission):

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By email:
direction@cssf.lu

Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 working days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within a maximum of 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Secrétariat Général
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to:

sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
 

Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman: 

www.bankingombudsman.ch

 

Weekly Update - Wuhan goes viral (update)

The number of confirmed cases of Wuhan flu has continued its rapid increase, rising from 282 on January 20th, to 11,953 on the 31st and 28,276 on February 5th according to the World Health Organisation’s daily reports. How bad is the outbreak? And what is the outlook for global growth and markets?

The number of confirmed cases of Wuhan flu has continued its rapid increase, rising from 282 on January 20th, to 11,953 on the 31st and 28,276 on February 5th according to the World Health Organisation’s daily reports. How bad is the outbreak? And what is the outlook for global growth and markets?
So far, the virus spread has been mainly concentrated in mainland China, which represents 99% of all current confirmed cases. Moreover, 70% of those cases are in Hubei province, of which Wuhan is the capital. Internationally, the spread appears to have been slower thus far, rising at approximately half the rate in China since end January. Although many commentators have questioned the accuracy of Beijing’s reports, the international data suggests that China might have been rather transparent in its communication of cases.
The crisis has prompted a series of draconian measures to combat the progression of the virus, closing factories and offices after the planned return from the lunar new year holiday, restricting travel to and from the most-affected areas while a number of territories such as Australia and the United States have barred entry to foreigners arriving from mainland China. Given these restrictions, global supply chains are being disrupted, with many manufacturers warning of looming component shortages.
The economic impact of the SARS epidemic saw Chinese GDP growth slow by an estimated 1% in the first half of 2003. The measures taken this time round are more comprehensive, suggesting that the hit to growth could be harder this year – Standard & Poor’s, the rating agency, estimates that real growth in China could slow to 5% for the whole year, down from 6.1% in 2019. Moreover, China is a much larger, more integrated part of world business than it was 17 years ago – it represents 19.3% of global GDP today in purchasing power parity terms, up from 8.7% in 2003.
Regarding equity markets, the SARS outbreak saw Chinese equity markets tumble 10% until the outbreak began to come under control in late-April 2003, before rallying steadily higher (see left-hand chart). This time round, the MSCI China index is down 4.4% since January 20th, having touched -9.2% last week, while the onshore CSI300 index tumbled 11.9% before retracing some of its fall to close Friday down 6.8%.
This stabilisation has sparked hopes that the speed of progression has begun to slow. The day-to-day rate of increases in mainland China has indeed eased, from 47% on January 20th to 22% at end-January to 11% on February 6th. As illustrated in the right-hand table, actual confirmed cases have begun to undershoot initial projections. However, we should be cautious in drawing conclusions from the data available at this juncture – further declines in the propagation rate are necessary before we can look forward to the epidemic coming under control.

Bottom line. As we have seen, the hit to global growth is likely to be higher this year than in previous viral outbreaks. However, China stands ready to ease policy further if necessary, after injecting $173bn to money markets and cutting short-term rates by 10bp earlier this week. Moreover, previous cases suggest that the economic impact tends to be temporary, with output recovering to previous levels once the crisis comes under control. Coming weeks are likely to remain volatile for stocks, but we expect markets to recover lost ground in due course.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking