Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - When doves fly off… to politics

In recent weeks, the most recent presidents of the world’s two most powerful central banks have moved into the political arena. First, Janet Yellen – the ex-president of the US Federal Reserve (Fed) – was appointed as the Biden administration’s Treasury Secretary. And then last week, the Italian president asked Mario Draghi – the ex-president of the European Central Bank (ECB) – to form a new coalition government. What do these two appointments signify? And what does all this mean for the economic outlook and for markets?

The appointment of Janet Yellen to replace Steven Mnuchin at the Treasury has reinforced our conviction that the Biden White House will pursue expansionary economic policies. During her four years at the head of the Federal Reserve (Fed), she gained a reputation as a “dove”, despite having overseen the start of normalisation of monetary policy from December 2015 onwards. Before chairing the Fed, her career spanned academia (specialising in labour market economics) and public services (for example, as Chair of Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisors).

For his part, Mario Draghi left the ECB with the reputation of having saved the euro zone. His most famous moment came in July 2012. During a speech in London, he held that “the ECB is ready to do whatever it takes to preserve the euro… and, believe me, it will be enough”. These simple words began to calm the market‘s fears. And then, a week later, he announced the creation of a new monetary policy tool, known as Outright Monetary Transactions (OMT) – this programme involves massive secondary market purchases of the most neglected sovereign bonds in order to bring their yields closer to Germany’s. OMT were never actually used but their mere presence in the ECB’s “tool box” proved enough to convince investors that Draghi’s “whatever it takes” was credible.

Draghi and Yellen’s experience as central bankers will certainly be a key determinant in their political agendas. They both presided over the launch of zero or negative interest rates and advocated the extension of asset purchase programmes in order to ensure ample liquidity and to keep the cost of bond and bank borrowing at low levels. And both placed much less emphasis on price stability than their predecessors.

During her time at the Fed, Yellen pushed for less focus on the headline unemployment rate and more emphasis on labour market exclusion and participation rates. This approach dovetails with the Fed’s new focus on “maximum employment” (see our September 4 Weekly Update) and seems particularly apposite at present. January’s job data again disappointed economists, while weekly initial claims for unemployment benefits still remain well above the highs registered during previous recessions.

For his part, Mario Draghi has kept a high degree of credibility with both investors and the Italian electorate. However, will he have the political skills to succeed as prime minister? In our view, his greatest success leading the ECB may not have been his ability to convince markets that he could save the euro. It may in fact have been his ability to convince Angela Merkel not to stand in his way, despite fierce opposition from the Bundesbank. Which stands as a testament to high levels of political skill.

Bottom line. Yellen and Draghi’s successors have held their course of extremely easy monetary policy, which has kept real bond yields (after accounting for inflation) at negative levels. And enormous asset purchases have eased the financing of ambitious fiscal support programmes on both sides of the Atlantic, which are designed to mitigate the negative effects of lockdown and to encourage a cyclical recovery in H2 2021. In this context, equity markets still have the potential to outperform other asset classes.

Read full article​​​​​​​

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking