Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking ? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data ?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim ?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Out of the blue?

European Central Bank (ECB) president Christine Lagarde has consistently argued that the central bank cannot be the sole source of policy support and that more is required from the EU and national governments. This has long seemed to be wishful thinking, with heads of state failing to agree on a recovery fund at their meeting on April 23. However, hopes were revived after Monday’s joint press conference by the German and French leaders. Will they again be dashed? And what does all this mean for the economy and markets?

Approaches to fiscal policy within the EU have long been deeply divided. Some countries like France have argued for budget union financed by EU debt issuance. Others, led by Germany, have remained opposed to fiscal transfers to weaker, more indebted states such as Italy. With unanimity among the 27 remaining member states required, EU fiscal policy seemed in deadlock. This week’s announcement came out of the blue. On May 18, Chancellor Merkel and President Macron announced plans for a €500bn recovery fund to help the EU economy rebuild after the deep recession sparked by lengthy lockdowns to stem the coronavirus pandemic. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has estimated that the euro zone economy will contract -7.5% this year and recover by only 4.7% in 2021. The €2.7tn in fiscal support unveiled so far – some 23% of euro zone GDP – has been dominated by national governments led by Germany, with direct EU funding only representing 4% of the total. Fiscal flexibility is unevenly distributed across the region. In Italy, the IMF estimates that debt will reach 155.4% of GDP this year, up by 20.7 percentage points from 2019, while France and Spain will see debt-to-GDP ratios of 115.4% and 113.4% respectively. In their 2010 academic study This Time is Different, Reinhart and Rogoff suggested that real economic growth tends to slow when debt rises above 90% of GDP. Clearly, Germany and the Netherlands – with forecast ratios of 68.7% and 58.3% – are better positioned than their neighbours. Moreover, Italy and Spain – with CoViD-19 deaths of 537 and 598 per million – have suffered more from the pandemic than Germany with 98 fatalities per million. The recent German Constitutional Court ruling on the ECB’s Public Sector Purchase Programme (PSPP) for buying government bonds served to underline the potential constraints on the central bank’s policy flexibility and the uncomfortable bind imposed on the German government (see our Weekly Update Cat Among the Pigeons). Luckily, opinion polls show high approval ratings for Chancellor Merkel’s handling of the crisis, opening a window of opportunity. Against this backdrop, the Franco-German agreement broke new ground. Merkel and Macron have agreed that 1) the €500bn recovery fund should be financed by bonds issued directly by the EU and jointly guaranteed by its members, 2) the European Commission budget should be raised from 1.2% to 2% of members’ gross national income to enable the EU to service the debt and 3) the fund’s disbursements should come as grants rather than loans to be repaid. These proposals will now form the basis for the Commission’s formal recovery fund blueprint which is due to be published on May 27. Of course, there will be fierce opposition, most notably from the Netherlands, Austria, Denmark and Sweden, which continue to espouse rigorous budget principles. But with Germany abandoning its previous adherence to austerity and reaffirming its alignment with France, an agreement now seems possible.

Bottom line. It is clear that the euro zone economy will require new stimulus as it emerges from the life support provided by current packages, and that such measures should be directed to those economies most in need, just as announced by France and Germany. The currency market reacted by marking the euro 1% higher against the Swiss franc, suggesting a positive shift in the outlook for the euro zone. Whether that shift might materialise or not will become clear at the next European Council summit on June 18-19.

Read full article

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking