Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - “It’s Getting Better, A Little Better All the Time”

As vaccination programmes have accelerated across the globe, many governments – in particular, across North America and Europe – have begun to ease lockdown restrictions. The resulting gradual reopening of businesses and stores has bolsteredhousehold and corporate confidence, as witnessed by the preliminary Purchasing Manager Index (PMI) reports for May. Is the economic crisis now behind us? And what would that mean for markets?

The PMI reports are monthly surveys of many thousands of businesses worldwide, covering manufacturing and services, which provide a timely measure of activity. Respondents are asked whether business has improved or deteriorated, and the results are collated on a scale of 0 to 100 so that the 50-point level marks the dividing line between expansion and contraction in activity. Needless to say, surveys plumbed historical depths last year as the pandemic unfolded and over half of the world’s inhabitants were placed in lockdown. This year, confidence is back with a bang.

In the euro zone, the May reports delivered another upside surprise compared with consensus expectations. The composite index – which covers all sectors – reached a post-pandemic high at 56.9 points, up 3.9 compared with April. The country-level surveys for France and Germany gained 6.3 and 2.9 points respectively, which implies that periphery economies like Italy and Spain must have gained around 5 points. This is corroborated by mobility indicators which show that Italy and Spain are already back at last summer’s levels, which augurs well for strong consumer spending on goods and services over the summer months.

The pickup in confidence across the region was driven by services. Here again, France delivered the largest upside surprise as the country began to exit lockdown. On the other hand, the manufacturing survey for the euro zone came out largely unchanged – down only 0.1 points versus April. Much of this softness was concentrated in Germany where industry has been quite hard hit by supply bottlenecks, notably in semiconductors. Moreover, it should be noted that the manufacturing index is distorted by the supplier delivery times subindex, which has added around 3 points to the total. This index is telling us that delivery times are much, much longer than at the peak of the previous cycle in 2018, which means that when supply chain disruptions ease, confidence levels in industry will actually decline.

In the US, the PMI reports were extremely strong too. The manufacturing survey beat expectations at 61.5 points, up from 60.5 in April, on better sentiment on production and new orders. Here, too, respondents noted swelling backlogs due to component shortages. In services, there was a huge rebound as reopening gathered a head of steam – the index hit 70.1 points, well above the 64.4 forecast. The composite index naturally followed suit reaching 68.1 points, the highest level since the post-Great Recession recovery in 2009.

It should be noted however that Q2’s PMI surveys are likely to mark the high point of the recovery. As mentioned earlier, the index is constructed by comparing the number of respondents who see improvement with those who still see a downturn. It is not surprising that the numbers are so high at this stage in the cycle when almost everyone is seeing a post-pandemic pickup. As the recovery advances, the PMI indices are likely to revert lower, as has already happened in China – the high point in their manufacturing index came last November, since when it has eased back to 54.7 points, well below the current levels in the US and the euro zone.

Bottom line. May’s PMI surveys serve to reinforce conviction in our scenario of synchronised global recovery in the second half of 2021. Moreover, inflation fears have begun to subside – a bit earlier than we expected – which has enabled bond markets to regain some of their recent lost ground. In this context, we remain convinced that equities are the most attractive asset class and we reiterate our preference for more cyclically sensitive markets like the euro zone and the UK.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking