Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Covid-19 – The Policy Response

An increasing number of countries have decided to shut down large swathes of their economies – most recently, California has ordered inhabitants to stay at home, other than for essential trips. Such measures seem essential to stem the spread of the coronavirus – as demonstrated in China, Taiwan or Hong Kong – but they do exact a heavy economic toll.

According to our economists’ latest projections, the euro zone economy should see a fall of -0.7% in its GDP this year.

If the pandemic comes under control by June as is currently expected, the second half of 2020 should see a return to more normal levels of activity, accelerating into 2021 when our economists expect growth to reach 1.2%. The speed and scale of recovery is dependent on three main factors – a successful public health policy of containment, properly functioning financial and interbank markets and, finally, government support for businesses, artisans and households. In terms of the public health response, the World Health Organisation is calling for testing for Covid-19 to be ramped up. Further, many medical researchers have concluded that the quicker shutdowns are in place, the quicker the spread of infection can be slowed. This suggests that many countries may have to push through more draconian measures, meaning that the economic impact is likely to grow further. The response from central banks has been unprecedented in its scale and speed. Yesterday alone saw rate cuts in Taiwan, Indonesia, South Africa and the United Kingdom – the Bank of England cut rates by 15 basis points to 0.1%, the lowest level in its 326-year history. The BoE also boosted its asset purchase programme by £200bn to £645bn. Late on Wednesday evening, the European Central bank held an extraordinary meeting and decided to create a new asset purchase plan totalling €750bn, to be deployed until at least the end of 2020. This comes in addition to the ECB’s existing programmes (which should total around €320bn for the remainder of this year), meaning a 40% increase in its total holdings. The US Federal Reserve has also been active this week, launching a support programme for the commercial paper market (short-term corporate borrowing instruments totalling $1tn) to ensure continued access to liquidity for companies. The Fed also relaunched its Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility, last used during the 2007-2009 crisis, to ensure that funds would be able to meet requests for cash. And yesterday, the Fed opened swap lines with nine more central banks (including Brazil, South Korea and Australia), to ensure ready access to cheap dollars across the globe. This comes in reaction to signs of a dollar shortage for global businesses, which had pushed the greenback up 15.7% year-to-date against an index of emerging currencies by this Wednesday. Since the Fed acted, the dollar has eased lower by around 1%. Central bank policy is deployed to keep the financial and interbank markets functioning. However, it will do little to help businesses and households in the short term. This is where government policy comes in. In recent days, a dizzying series of announcements from authorities has unfolded. Massive programmes of loan guarantees for businesses and direct support for companies and families have been introduced. In the euro zone, these amount to some 8.5% of GDP while London’s support packages could reach 15% of the UK economy. In the US, the Republican party yesterday unveiled a $1tn fiscal stimulus plan (around 5% of GDP) which includes $1,200 payments to adults and $500 for every child to help with meeting essential needs.

Bottom line. The combined effect of the stimulus on offer has enabled markets to stabilise since mid-week, with global equities rising yesterday while government bond yields fell. However, the expected increase in new Covid-19 cases is likely to spark new restrictions and shutdowns on economies. Although this in turn is likely to be met with further easing measures by central banks and governments, markets are likely to remain volatile and a very defensive stance remains advisable.

Read full article.

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking