Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Cat Among the Pigeons

The German Constitutional Court (BVG) has often had to deliberate on cases brought by conservative German economists, unhappy with some aspect of European Union policy. In their latest judgement on May 5, the judges in Karlsruhe ruled that the European Central Bank (ECB) should provide further justification of its bond-buying programme. Does this mean that the ECB’s autonomy will be limited? And what could be the impact on the economy and markets?

In previous cases, the BVG has ruled in favour of EU institutions. In 2016 for example, it rejected a challenge to the EU-Canada free trade deal. And in 2014, it decided that the legality of government bond purchases via quantitative easing should be determined by the European Court of Justice (ECJ), which duly ruled in the ECB’s favour. So this month’s decision – which challenges the ECJ’s ruling – came as a surprise to markets. The BVG has given the German Bundestag and government three months to ensure that the ECB has conducted a “proportionality assessment” of its Public Sector Purchase Programme (PSPP) for buying government bonds. This means that the central bank should demonstrate its assessment that the PSPP’s impact on achieving the ECB’s policy objective (to keep inflation close to but below 2%) is not outweighed by other “economic and fiscal policy effects”. And if the proportionality assessment is not forthcoming, the BVG indicated that the Bundesbank may not continue with PSPP purchases. Interestingly, the BVG found no problem with the possibility that the PSPP could be considered a form of monetary financing of government debt. Moreover, the ECB’s economists will certainly have produced vast amounts of research into the PSPP’s consequences before the governing council decided to go ahead. However, the ECB may prove reluctant to provide such data – it is after all independent from government influence and subject only to the ECJ’s jurisdiction, not that of the BVG. Further, the vast majority of the ECB’s purchases this year fall under the Pandemic Emergency Purchase Plan (PEPP) which was not covered by the BVG’s ruling. The BVG’s ruling leaves all parties in a bind – the German government, the Bundesbank, the European Commission, the ECB and the ECJ. The issue lies less with the continuation of asset purchases. Bundesbank president Weidmann has indicated he is confident that a way forward can be found. And the ECB intends to continue with its current policies regardless. The issue rather lies in the constitutional and political domain. By judging that the ECJ’s ruling in favour of the PSPP was “incomprehensible”, the BVG has opened the door to further national challenges to the ECJ’s precedence over domestic laws. In this respect, Chancellor Merkel’s reaction has been instructive. She told the Bundestag that Germany should be guided by a “clear political compass” which for her means a “strong single currency”. Merkel added that the BVG ruling should spur the euro zone on to “more integration, rather than less”. Clearly, she wants to avoid a political and constitutional crisis at this juncture. As illustrated by the left-hand chart, the euro zone’s response to the coronavirus-induced recession has been lopsided. National governments have done more than the EU in terms of support programmes. And among countries, those with the healthiest public finances – such as Germany – have done more than weaker members such as Italy and Spain, although the latter need the support much more than Germany does. However, there will be an opportunity to redress the balance next week when the Commission presents its blueprint for the Recovery Fund ahead of the next European Council summit on June 18-19.

Bottom line. The market reaction to the BVG bombshell has been muted as investors have judged – correctly in our view – that there would be no immediate interruption to ECB purchases. However, the political and constitutional consequences could be much further-reaching and can only be addressed by EU leaders following through on their ambitions for more integration.

Read the article

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking