Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - A Busy Week in Europe

Last week, EU leaders finally adopted the post-pandemic recovery fund while the European Central Bank (ECB) eased monetary policy as previously signalled. Then this week, the ECB’s supervisory board lifted the ban of euro zone banks distributing dividends while UK and EU trade negotiators inched towards some form of agreement. What do these events mean for the European economy and what might be the impact on markets?

Last week’s European Council brought together the 27 EU leaders for a two-day summit. One of the key items on the agenda was the approval of the next multi-year EU budget of €1.1tn and the €750bn recovery package – also known as the Next Generation EU fund. The fund was launched at the July summit, but its formal approval had been held up by pushback from Poland and Hungary regarding provisions making disbursements from NGEU conditional on the respect of the rule of law.

Thanks to the compromise struck last week, the European Commission will be able to push ahead with the issuance of € 390bn in EU debt which will be jointly guaranteed by members, a first for the Union. The proceeds from the bonds will be distributed in the form of grants to member states, with the remainder of the package coming as loans. The €750bn total represents around 5.4% of EU GDP and its disbursements will be skewed towards those members most in need – Italy for example is set to receive around 10% of its GDP in total and Spain some 14% (their domestic support measures this year represented 3.6% and 2.9% of respective GDPs).

The ECB’s last meeting of the year brought no surprises – the Pandemic Emergency Purchase Programme was boosted by €500bn to €1.85tn and will now continue until March 2022 while the support measures for bank lending were increased by €300bn and extended until June 2022. With headline euro zone inflation falling to -0.3% year-on-year in November and the economy back in lockdown-induced recession in Q4, easy monetary policy is likely to remain in place for years to come. Brexit negotiators are running out of time. The UK exited the EU on January 31 this year and the transition period – during which it remains part of the single market and customs union – will end on December 31. Yesterday, the European Parliament’s Conference of Presidents stated that an agreement on trade would have to be finalised by Sunday to enable the Parliament to organise an extraordinary session before year-end to approve the deal.

It does appear from press reports that negotiators have made progress on the remaining stumbling blocks – fishing rights, state aid provisions and governance – but as yet no final agreement is in sight. Of course, the EU has accustomed us over the years to last-minute deals just when one was least expected. Looking at sterling, which reached its high for the year yesterday against the dollar at 1.3585, it appears that traders are convinced that another eleventh-hour agreement will be struck.

Bottom line. The NGEU deal eases market concerns about euro zone breakup and reinforces our conviction that the euro will continue to gain ground next year. The ECB’s asset purchases will serve to keep bond yields low for both core and periphery euro zone borrowers, a positive for financial markets in 2021 and beyond. The resumption of dividend payments by euro zone banks is good news but should not hide the fact that flat yield curves and rising bad loan risks are lasting negatives for bank profitability. And finally, a Brexit trade deal may see sterling spike a bit higher, but the move should prove short-lived – whatever the terms of the agreement, trade with the EU (the UK’s main export market) will be handicapped next year.

Read full article

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking