Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - The American Plans

In recent weeks, press reports have talked of a massive $3 trillion Biden recovery plan for the US economy. On March 31, the president unveiled the first part, the American Jobs Plan - $2tn in infrastructure spending. Later this month, he is due to reveal details of a $1tn American Family Plan. How will the United States pay for all this spending? Will it kickstart inflation? And what does all this mean for markets?

The American Jobs Plan is scheduled to be deployed over the next 8 years and marks a shift towards a more command-based economy. Biden’s intention is to steer investment and procurement spending towards those companies which aim to create domestic jobs. His policy priorities are clear – supporting US manufacturing, fighting climate change, reducing US dependence on China and maintaining its lead in technology. The plan is due to be paid for over the next 15 years, mainly by an increase in corporate taxes from 21% to 28%.

How will the money be spent? $621bn will go on transportation infrastructure (roads, bridges, public transportation, ports and airports) and electric vehicles; $561bn on green buildings, power upgrades and clean water; $480bn on subsidising manufacturing, including $180bn in R&D on artificial intelligence and semi-conductors; $400bn on care for the elderly and disabled; and $200bn on high-speed broadband and job-training. Biden’s pivot towards sustainability and the green economy runs through the programmes. Auto-makers will receive hundreds of billions to produce batteries and to retool plants, while the
administration invests in building a nationwide network of charging stations. Money will go to building energy-efficient buildings and retrofitting the existing stock of homes and commercial buildings. And Biden plans to modernise the electric grid via at least 20 gigawatts of high-voltage power lines, a long-standing weakness as shown by February’s power outages in Texas.

The plan clearly focuses on obvious weaknesses in the US economy – its dilapidated infrastructure is widely recognised by voters and a long-term drag on competitiveness. However, the tax increases will face fierce opposition from Republicans in Congress. Nonetheless, some voices on the left of the Democratic party say the plan – which amounts to 9.6% of GDP – doesn’t go far enough!

The House majority leader, Nancy Pelosi, hopes to have approved the bill by July 4, which would enable the Senate to pass it before Congress goes into its August summer recess. This calendar may prove somewhat optimistic, given the Democrats’ slim majorities in both chambers. The House of Representatives is split 219-211 in their favour and the Senate balanced 50-50, with the deciding vote cast by Vice-President Harris – Biden cannot afford to lose more than 3 Democratic votes in the House and none in the Senate if he is to get the legislation through.

Recognising this, the White House has declared that it is open to suggestions for changes in Biden’s proposals. The next few months will thus be devoted to detailed review and refinement of the plan. Given the size of the tax increases, the bill is unlikely to attract much support from Republicans, meaning that the Democrats will have to use the budget reconciliation process – this allows a party a single simple-majority Senate vote each year, thereby avoiding the “filibuster” tactic which can block bills which don’t attract 60 senators.

Bottom line. The sheer size of Biden’s two new plans is likely to keep inflation worries high and upward pressure on bond yields. On the other hand, the tax increases may cause concern that the recovery could be stymied and that the decrease in after-tax profits could hit the equity market. However, it should be noted that this is only a partial reversal of Trump’s 2017 cut of corporate taxes from 35% to 21% – half of the cuts will stay in place. All in all, we remain Neutral on US equities and continue to prefer more cyclically-sensitive markets in Europe and Japan.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking