Private clients Financial intermediaries

Become a client

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - A new impetus for European construction in 2022

Discover the weekly economic outlook of our Investement Strategy team.

Expect a new political balance in 2022
Germany got a new chancellor this week, Olaf Scholz, as well as a new government, backed by a brand new political coalition comprising the Social Democrats, Liberal party and the Greens. Early statements have been clearly pro European construction, continuing the direction taken by Germany since the COVID crisis broke. The new government could well mark a turning point, toward a more global policy positive for Europe, just as Europeans are recovering their confidence in the EU. This new balance will, of course, depend on what happens in the Italian and French elections scheduled for the first half of 2022 and will have to quickly tackle two big medium-term issues: encouraging more sustainable growth and locking in systems to provide international solidarity.

Investing to sustainably boost future growth
While Europe has managed the economics of the health crisis satisfactorily, once the crisis is over it will once again confront its structural issues, most notably the problem of slowing potential growth. One of the first items on the agenda will be finding new ways to invest that can restart productivity growth (notably by investing in digital) and speed up the energy transition. The New Generation EU stimulus package marked a step change in targeting investment on countries with smaller budgets. The upcoming debate on overhauling the Stability and Growth Pact will be key to heading off an economically harmful policy of fiscal austerity while recreating a framework to rein in excessive spending. The new German government is showing itself open to greater flexibility when it comes to the new rules.

Strengthening financial union
European countries, particularly those in the euro zone, also need to keep working on the projects to strengthen financial union, essential to keep capital flowing smoothly throughout the EU. Early announcements by the German government have been promising on the work that needs doing to complete the Banking Union, proposing a reinsurance system to replace the controversial proposal of a European deposit guarantee scheme. On a parallel track, states need to make progress toward Capital Markets Union to better channel Europe's ample stock of savings into productive investment.

A relief for the ECB from the risk of fragmentation
Europe will see a new political balance emerge in the first half of 2022. It could continue the spirit of greater unity forged in the heat of the COVID crisis in 2020, and pave the way for progress on fiscal and financial union. More political unity would in time relieve the European Central Bank of its ongoing pressure to counter the risks of fragmentation. Since the euro zone crisis of 2011/12, the ECB has maintained its asset purchase programme largely to head off this risk. An easing of pressure on this front would give the bank breathing room to pursue its primary objective, containing inflation.

Read full article

Clémentine Gallès Chief Economist and Strategist Societe Generale Private Banking