Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Les banques centrales toujours dans le camp d’une inflation transitoire

Discover the weekly economic outlook of our Investement Strategy team.

Eurozone and US central banks in line with expectations
The beginning of the month was marked by the monetary policy meetings of the European Central Bank (ECB), the Federal Reserve (Fed) and the Bank of England (BoE). As expected, the ECB kept its key rates unchanged. It also maintained the pace of securities purchases and announced that "as things stand", the end of net purchases related
to the pandemic would take place as planned in March 2022. On the US side, as also expected, the Fed did not change its key rate and announced the tapering of its asset purchases program. More specifically, it will reduce its net purchases by 15 billion dollars per month starting in November (10 billion Treasuries and 5 billion MBS), which will stabilize its balance sheet in June 2022. On the other hand, the BoE surprised the markets by keeping its benchmark
rate at 0.1% while the market consensus was for a 15 basis point increase. It also kept its asset purchase program unchanged.

Central banks continue to defend the thesis oftransitory inflation
These decisions were highly awaited in a context where inflation in these 3 regions continues to be above the central banks' target and is expected to remain high in the coming months. During her press conference, Christine Lagarde maintained that inflation in the euro zone reflects transitory factors, namely the rise in energy prices, the increase in taxation in certain countries and the mismatch between supply and demand linked to the reopening of the economy.
Furthermore, she emphasizes that the conditions for a start to hike rates (inflation reaches 2% over a two-year horizon and remains at this level in the long term in the ECB's projections, core inflation compatible with total inflation at 2% over the medium term) would not be met in 2022. Jerome Powell, in a similar manner, also insisted on
the transitory nature of inflation, expecting it to return to the target during 2022. J. Powell also emphasized that the reduction in asset purchases was to be decoupled from the rate hike cycle, leaving it to wait for a real recovery in the US labor market to begin.

Financial markets question the transitory aspect of inflation
Ms. Lagarde and Mr. Powell's statements come at a time when financial markets are beginning to anticipate that inflationary pressures could be more durable than central banks had expected, forcing them to raise rates sooner and faster than expected. Thus, the markets are now anticipating two Fed rate hikes in 2022 and four rate hikes in 2023. On the ECB side, statements by Mrs. Lagarde and other ECB members have allowed a decrease in rate hike expectations after a visible adjustment in late October.

Conclusion
In an environment where inflation will remain high in the months to come with the risk of upside surprises, the interest rate market will remain volatile. The very cautious nature of central banks will continue to be favorable to equities and corporate bonds.

Read full article

Clémentine Gallès Chief Economist and Strategist Societe Generale Private Banking