Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking ? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data ?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim ?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Extraordinary Measures

The scale of support from central banks and governments to address the public health and economic crises caused by the CoViD-19 pandemic has been extraordinary, as has the speed with which the new measures have been launched. What will be the long-term impact of such policy easing? And what is the outlook for markets?

The Fed has offered $2.3tn in additional support to businesses and to credit markets. The largest programmes are: 1) It will buy up to $750bn in corporate bonds on both the primary and secondary markets, including the bonds of “fallen angels”, that is issuers whose credit rating has been downgraded to the High Yield (HY) or junk category. And it will also buy HY exchangetraded funds (ETFs), the first time it has ventured into the riskiest segment of the bond market. 2) It has earmarked up to $600bn to support loans to “Main Street”, shorthand for small and medium sized businesses. This will be a “public/private” partnership with commercial banks, which will originate the loans. 3) The Fed will also buy short-term notes issued by states, the largest counties and cities of over 1 million inhabitants, up to $500bn in total. This is designed to kick-start the municipal bond market which has dried up in recent weeks. These measures are equivalent in aggregate to 11% of US GDP and should be instrumental in returning US credit markets to a more stable footing. The BoE surprised observers by announcing short-term monetary financing of government spending, a move which the BoE Governor had ruled out only a few days ago. This enables the Treasury to continue to spend on its various support programmes without having to tap the sovereign bond (gilt) market. Already, the Chancellor had increased planned gilt issuance in April from £15bn to £45bn but more will be needed. There is an urgent need to make good on commitments, such as the promise to pay 80% of laid-off workers’ monthly wages (this could cost £30-40bn over the next three months according to the Resolution Foundation). The Eurogroup also reached agreement yesterday on a number of support measures for the euro zone: 1) The European Stability Mechanism will be authorised to extend up to €240bn in non-conditional loans to member countries to finance the direct and indirect healthcare costs they face. 2) The European Investment Bank will extend €200bn in loan guarantees for small and medium sized companies across the region. 3) The European Commission’s SURE €100bn programme to finance short-term working was also approved. In addition to these measures, the Eurogroup also announced a commitment to set up a temporary €500bn fund to finance reconstruction after the coronavirus recession. Encouraging though these announcements are, they still need to be approved by heads of State at a forthcoming meeting, meaning that the support burden will continue to be borne by national governments for now.

Bottom line. The battle to minimise the economic fall-out from coronavirus containment and lockdowns will see debt burdens rise enormously in coming quarters. Governments will hope that their measures will soften the blow to GDP and foster a rapid recovery from recession, thereby enabling them to return to more orthodox budget and fiscal policies in due course. Many investors, however, may fear that government finances will remain on an unsustainable footing, meaning that central bank asset purchases to keep bond yields – and hence borrowing costs – low are likely to remain in place for the foreseeable future.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking