Private clients Financial intermediaries

Become a client

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Trends #1

Tourism, architecture, environment, design, sport, art, research... The main trends of the moment.
The application

Finding lost dogs

In the United States, nearly 10 million dogs are lost each year. Faced with this situation, the dog food brand Iams has come up with a novel solution. The NoseID is an application that lets you to find your dog... using just the tip of its snout! Very much like a fingerprint, every dog’s nose is di!erent. Each owner simply creates a profile for their dog in the application, fills in some information (name, breed, coat...) and then scans their dog’s nose. If the dog gets lost and someone scans its nose, the dog can be matched and returned to its owner. The application, which is still in its infancy, is currently being tested in Nashville. If successful, the service is likely to be rolled out in other cities.

The good deed

Become a sponsor of a coral and help restore the reefs

We are seeing more and more sponsorship initiatives that hold out the hope of a more sustainable world. You can now adopt a coral as your personal contribution to reinstating the coral reefs that provide the home for 25% of marine biodiversity and whose existence is now under very real threat. Coral Guardian offers to “look after” a coral for €30. The lucky sponsor receives an adoption certificate with a photo, GPS location and the name of the team member who will transplant his or her coral. For its pilot project off Hatamin, Indonesia, the French association has transplanted 40,000 corals in four years, which has increased the number of fish by 30 times and created 30 jobs.

The place

An infinite library

The Chinese bookstore chain Zhongshuge is setting out to encourage people to pick up books once more by offering them in a truly sumptuous setting. This challenge to help us rediscover our inner bookworm has been brilliantly met by the young architect Li Xiang and her company X+Living, who has designed the interiors of the new bookshops. The latest one has just opened in Taiyuan, 200 kilometres from Beijing, and covers 4,600m2. Zhongshuge has joined forces with Fab Cinema to offer a unique experience combining a taste of reading with the pleasure of entertainment. Very representative of Li Xiang’s design aesthetic, a multitude of mirrors play with volumes, enlarging the space and giving the illusion that one is surrounded by shelves stretching off into infinity. A vertiginous experience and a meditation on knowledge in its limitless diversity.

The Startup

French entrepreneurs have been designing a 100% natural urban lighting system

“In France, we may not have oil but we do have ideas.” This slogan from the 1970s neatly sums up the ethos of the French startup Glowee, which is working on bioluminescence: the production and emission of light by living organisms such as fireflies and glow worms but also around 80% of marine organisms in general. In order to promote the use of low environmental impact urban lighting, the company is developing a raw material made from natural micro-organisms that can simply be cultivated ad infinitum. And they have now signed their first partnership agreement with the town of Rambouillet which will serve as a testing ground for this “brilliant” idea!

The study

Our brain prefers adding to subtracting

According to a study published in the journal Nature, when faced with a certain problem or difficulty, our brains tend to add up rather than take away, regardless of whether or not it is the most rational or aesthetic solution. And this also applies to restoring symmetry as well as to adjusting a sense of balance or improving a certain text. Is it because additive ideas come to mind faster or because our subconscious has associated a positive character with the “+” sign and a negative character  with the “-” sign? In any case, this cognitive bias makes it easier to understand overloaded schedules, the multiplication of functions or the seemingly limitless drive to exploit natural resources.

The discovery

The suture that detects infections

With a little beetroot juice (and a lot of thought!), Dasia Taylor may have found a simple and inexpensive way to control scars and detect infection. The American high school student invented a suture impregnated with beetroot juice that turns from bright red when the skin is healthy (pH of about 5) to dark purple when it becomes infected (pH of 9). The African-American teenager was guided by a concern for fairness, aware of the inequalities in the risk of post-operative infection between people living in Africa and the United States. Encouraged by the many awards she has received, Dasia Taylor is continuing her research into improving her infection-detecting suture, including exploring the antibacterial properties of beetroot.

The sport

Surfing among the glaciers in the Lofoten Islands

Surfing in winter has some disadvantages, notably the temperature of the air and water, but also many advantages, such as being alone in experiencing the vastness of nature. Fortunately, surfing in the Lofoten Islands minimises the former and maximises the latter. On the one hand, the water is at a positively balmy 5°C in February, which is now more bearable due to the technical progress in equipment, although still requires a certain inner fortitude, and on the other hand, the waves are truly impressive, illuminated by the ethereal glow of the Northern Lights. This show can certainly be admired in isolation, in all its glorious splendour, given that tourists are few and far between on this remote Norwegian archipelago. As for the inhabitants, there are just 18 of them in Unstad, the most famous surf spot on the islands.

The object

The chair that converts into a work of art (and vice versa)

Hamari is a Finnish company that specialises in creating chairs for auditoriums, theatres, cinemas and concert halls. Its recent collaboration with designer Philip Kronqvist set out to develop an art project that is rather more striking than the chairs it usually produces. Together they have designed an object that is both an armchair and a work of art, paying tribute to Piet Mondrian. Inspired by the famous Composition with Red Blue and Yellow, it looks like the painting when not in use and transforms when one is seated. Certainly a creation that we would love to see in theatres and museums!

The prize

Three emerging artists win the acclaim of KLEINWORT HAMBROS

Created in 2019, the Kleinwort Hambros Emerging Artist Prize is awarded annually to a particularly prolific UK-based young talent from the world of contemporary art. In view of the weakened state of the cultural sector due to the current health crisis, this year it was awarded to three finalists, selected from 15 applicants. Shawanda Corbett, Ayo Akingbade and Olu Ogunnaike, respectively a ceramist, a film director and a visual artist, were praised for the originality and clarity of their work by a jury of prestigious figures from the British art scene. A great opportunity to be cast in the spotlight!