Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking ? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data ?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim ?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Polar opposites

The environment, the extreme climate and isolation, the unique wildlife... Polar travel is exceptional in every way. Beyond the magnetic beauty of the landscapes, it is also an inner adventure that provokes a range of emotions and encourages reflection.

The intoxicating effects of space and freedom

Environments that hold out such promise have become rare indeed. 
But the Arctic and Antarctic are synonymous with open space. Vast expanses of immaculate ice floes, virgin lands bathed in light, sometimes diffuse and sometimes dazzlingly bright close to the poles. Even on board a comfortable, specially equipped ship, there is always an air of adventure surrounding polar travel – after all, it’s not every day you meet narwhals and killer whales! – not to mention a breathtakingly pure sense of freedom. But each pole has its own special character. 
At the North Pole, the ocean is covered with pack ice, the home territory of polar bears (the word ‘Arctic’ is derived from the Greek arktos for ‘bear’), and has been populated for millennia by the Inuit, with their distinct culture and way of life. At the South Pole lies a gigantic mountainous island capped with ice and inhabited mainly by penguins and scientists on research missions. Two geographical spaces with two equally rich and distinct histories.

Listen to the silence

After just a few hours of travel, be it by plane or boat, the silence becomes palpable. Total. Mysterious. Relentless. No more phone calls, no more e-mails. To begin with, you feel rather off-balance, but it’s not long at all before you realise just how lucky you are: in our hyper-connected world, isolation and calm are beyond precious. Here, there’s no option but to leave a daily life, that tends to suck us increasingly into a perpetual whirlpool of demands and expectations, far behind. Liberated and relaxed, you’re finally free to marvel at the spectacle: the beauty of the drifting ice in Disko Bay, the midnight sun reflecting off the white continent, the flight of an Arctic tern over Tasiilaq, the fleeting magic of a northern dawn... The polar journey is also an inner journey.

Back to basics

Here is one of the paradoxes of a voyage to the poles. It requires a significant level of logistics and resources to reach places where the complete lack of both is the normal state of affairs. And the experience takes the traveller back to basics. In the empty vastness of these great white deserts, every action has a meaning, from eating, sleeping and drinking to protecting yourself against the elements, thinking about the basics, sharing points of view, listening and simply enjoying the peace and quiet. Many travellers find that the poles have a healing effect, sometimes to the point of mystical or philosophical revelation. In this endless emptiness, we find ourselves. We test our limits, physically embrace the concept of survival and adjust our points of reference. We return to the essentials of what it is to be human.

 

Being part of the big picture

If there’s one issue that can’t be avoided or evaded when travelling to the Far North or Far South, it is this: as they marvel at the beauty of iridescent icebergs in shimmering light, polar travellers can only wonder whether they are one of the last lucky few to be seeing something destined to disappear. The journey to the poles is an appointment with the planet itself. Far to the south, hundreds of international scientists engaged in studying Antarctic ice are accumulating data on the effects of global warming. For the newcomer, the ‘light bulb’ moment often occurs in the extreme north through contact with Inuit populations who are having to adapt their way of life to deal with this “new normal”. When confronted with the real-life effects of climate change, many people return convinced of the necessity for action so that others can one day follow in their footsteps to experience the beauty of these regions for themselves.

Shoulder to shoulder with illustrious predecessors

Their names were Fridtjof Nansen, Ernest Shackleton and, of course, Roald Amundsen. The first discovered much of the Arctic aboard the expedition ship Fram, the memory of the second remains fresh as a result of the epic Endurance voyage to Antarctica, and the third pioneered Polar exploration before reaching the South Pole just ahead of the ill-fated Robert Falcon Scott expedition. Today’s name is Mike Horn (see our article). He also has an awesome record of solo and accompanied exploits at these extremities of the Earth. Each of these expeditions is a continuation of the previous one, with all that implies in terms of courage and lessons learned.
The resulting accumulation of experience inevitably comes to mind when travelling to either pole. It’s hard to avoid the feeling that you’re walking in the footsteps of these explorers, and tempting to think that you’ve entered their exclusive club on your return.

FROM TARA TO GREENLANDIA : Humanity and climate

“On returning from an expedition around the North Pole aboard Tara, I wanted to talk about the experience in a new way by focusing on the human issues involved”, says photographer and seasoned polar traveller Vincent Hilaire. And that was the genesis of the Greenlandia project (greenlandia.org), whose first mission in 2020 will focus on Scoresbysund Fjord, in Inuit territory, at 70° North latitude.
The purpose of this scientific, documentation and educational mission sponsored by French doctor, explorer and scientist Jean-Louis Étienne is to take time to listen, observe and document the everyday effects of climate change on the people who live in the extreme north. The central idea is to carry out this work in order to fill a gap in our knowledge, as Vincent Hilaire explains: “We know very little, or at least only unconnected pockets of information, about the effects of climate change on people”.

White and peaceful Antarctica

The white continent is also a land of peace. Now signed by 53 countries, the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 effectively states that all those territories south of the 60th parallel are reserved exclusively for scientific and non-military research. Antarctica, where the lowest temperature on Earth was recorded in July 1983 (-89.2°C), is home to some sixty scientific bases.