Contact

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Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data ?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Roman Janecek, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : MONPrivmonaco-DPO@socgen.com.

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim ?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
13,15 Boulevard des Moulins 
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
13,15 Boulevard des Moulins 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

On the Kumano Kodo trails

« In the mountain wilderness of the Kii Peninsula in Japan to the south of the Kansai region, the Kumano Kodo is a network of wonderful, but very rarely used, pathways forming what is undoubtedly the least well-known great treks of the world. It has become one of my essential getaway destinations. » (J.Galland – photographer & explorer)

Two culinary experiences

Ryokan Adumaya

With its indoor and outdoor hot spring baths (onsen and rotenburo), a visit to this ryokan (traditional inn) is all about reinvigoration. Hot water direct from the spring is also used in the kitchen to cook vegetables, meat, fish and tofu. The end result is an exquisite high-end menu. 122 Yunomine, Hongu cho.

Minshuku Tsugizakura

Professional chef Mr. Yuba worked all over the country before returning to his hometown to convert his home close to the Tsugizakura-oji temple into a minshuku (guesthouse). The multi-course Kaiseki Ryôri (fine dining) dinner menu is nothing short of a feast. 403-1 Nonaka, Nakahechi-cho.

Kiri-no-Sato Takahara Lodge Organic Hotel

The view from here is breathtaking. From the terrace, and even from your own tatami, the Hatenashi mountain range is all yours to contemplate. When the valley fills with morning mist, the effect is pure magic. The hot water supply for the bath comes directly from the Wataze Onsen in Hongu. The food here is never less than excellent. 826 Takahara, Nakahechi-cho.

Lose yourself in the depths of nature

 

Who would imagine that nature could be so geometric? The forest here on the Kii peninsular is dense. But above all, it proves to be rectilinear, marked out by an army of tree trunks in strict alignment. These are cryptomeria japonica – Japanese cedars – a species native to the archipelago and known locally as sugi. But their foliage is extraordinary, because these magnificent giants of trees are tens of metres high and up to 700 or even 1,000 years old. Some are sacred, and are marked as such by a white folded paper belt around their trunks. Between the trees wind multiple trails, and it is easy to imagine them as they were in the Middle Ages, paved in stone.

Take the Way of the Monks

The Kumano Kodo has many rest areas in which to get your breath back. You’ll come across many springs and other fountains of youth, altars and small-scale temples built beneath a tree or on rocks, statues with or without animals, wayside markers and memorial stones and buddhas, sometimes totally covered in moss. At Oyunohara, close to the Hongu Taisha shrine and surrounded by rice paddies, rises an enormous and majestic torii traditional Japanese gateway, almost 40 metres high. Not far from the temple of Fushiogami-oji, there are wonderful thick green plantations of tea bushes against an orange patchwork backdrop of yuzu trees.

Let go

 

For a first visit to Japan, you couldn’t dream of a better location. Watching the bus disappear into the distance having been dropped off at a mountain road junction in the hamlet of Takiriji is a deeply moving experience. In this remote place, there are no familiar reference points and the language is extremely challenging. The feeling, therefore, is one apprehension. Just a couple of steps away – your very first two steps really – is the Takiriji‑oji shrine; the starting point of the Kumano pilgrimage trails and the gateway to the sacred mountains. The questions come thick and fast: where does this trail lead? What will you find there? It’s high time to start the ascent. This happy acceptance of letting go seems an odd feeling...

Set foot in a sacred compound

Before you emerge from the valley to arrive at the large-scale shrine of Nachi Taisha, the final stage of the Kumano Kodo, you still have to climb a spectacular stone staircase. Its name – Daimon-zaka – means ‘ascent to the gateway’. Its 267 steps are flanked by centuries-old trees and thickets of bamboo. The strenuous climb is rewarded by a breath-taking panoramic view over the gorges, with the horizon provided by the Pacific Ocean. It’s a must to visit the many temples here, but particularly the three-level Vermillion pagoda of Seiganto-ji. However, the real showstopper is just behind it though: Nachi-no-Otaki, at 133 metres high and 13 metres wide it is Japan’s highest waterfall.

Relax in a thousand-year-old hot spring

 

Deep in a wooded valley, Yunomine is the ultimate spa village. The natural volcanic spring discovered here around 1,800 years ago is the oldest in Japan. It seems to change colour seven times a day, and bursts out of the rock at an initial temperature of 92.5°C, later settling down to around 42°C. Hence the number of onsen (hot spring) indoor baths, and rotenburo outdoor baths. The river that flows through the centre of the village also originates from the spring, and is so hot that villagers cook eggs and bamboo shoots in it. The real gem of Yunomine is Tsuboyu, a 12th-century cabin that houses the only onsen on the UNESCO World Heritage list. Visitors can rent it for private bathing, subject to a limit of just two people for a maximum of half an hour.

Five essentials before you leave

A bell : Once you’re on the trail, don’t be surprised if you hear the tinkling of a bell in the distance. It’s sure to be coming from Japanese walkers who have tied bells to their backpacks, following to the letter the instructions they’ve been given about protecting themselves from bears.

A pair of binoculars : To revel in the mountain landscape and view the Pacific Ocean from afar, but also to scan the sky for the Yatagarasu, the famous sacred crow and messenger of God.

A sketchbook : Not only to exercise your artistic talent, but also to collect the many and often splendid souvenir stamps that mark your progress along the Kumano Kodo.

A pocket Wi-Fi hub : There certainly aren’t many Internet cafés in the mountains, so if you’re afraid of getting lost, this tiny gadget weighing just 120-150 grams could be a useful way of getting online.

A book or two : Un monde flottant by Nicolas de Crécy (pub. Soleil, 2016) on the Japanese monsters, divinities and spirits known as Yokai. You should also read A Modern Pilgrimage: Along the Kumano Kodo by American photographer Harold Davies and published in a limited edition of 12 copies + 4 artist’s proofs.

IN TREKKING MODE

 

Plan for at least a five-day stay to trek along these still little-known, but utterly breathtaking pilgrimage trails.

 

The best time of the year to walk here is Spring. To organise a bespoke trek with accommodation, food and (efficient!) baggage transfer service, the best way is to contact the Tanabe City Kumano Tourism Bureau.

This tourist office is dedicated specifically to the Kumano Kudo and its Website of the tourist office for the Kumano Kudo: www.tb-kumano.jp/en