Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

The brain caught in the jam jar - The harmful effects of too many choices

Behavioural finance is defined by the application of psychology to finance: it differs from classical financial theory by considering individuals not as purely rational beings, but influenced by their emotions or by reasoning biases.

Whether you're strolling through the summer markets or - unfortunately already! - in the aisles dedicated to the new school year, you have probably been confronted with a difficult choice: red or purple swimsuit, large or small pencil case... In the light of our purchases this third quarter, let's discover an aspect of the indecision problem...

Richness of choice... thought paralysis!

Imagine yourself walking through the aisles of your supermarket next Saturday. At the corner of a gondola, you are offered to taste jams from a well-known brand, which you can then find on the shelves. The offer is all the more tempting as you can try as many flavours as you like and get a discount coupon when you buy! This is what happened to a sample of 754 people entering a California supermarket in 2000. Their experience is nourishing in more ways than one, since, without knowing it, they were observed for the purposes of a study(1)!

The small subtlety of the experiment lay in the number of jams offered for tasting: during a certain period of time, only 6 different jams were offered on the stand; the rest of the time, the choice was from a total of 24 flavours. Unsurprisingly, the wider choice attracted the attention of 60% of visitors, whereas only 40% of consumers stopped by the tasting stand when only 6 jams were on offer. But the discovery concerns the implied decision making: the act of purchase itself. 30% of the purchasers confronted with a choice limited to 6 jams proceeded to buy one or more jars ... whereas they were only 3% to do it in front of an abundant choice of 24 flavours! The explanations proposed are multiple: the consumers attracted by the narrower choic of 6 jams were more interested by the selection displayed, they considered the 6 flavours "special"...

If according to the French proverb "abundance of goods does not harm", the abundance of choice can be harmful by risking to lose some or the others. You will easily understand, that's why the big online retailers or the video on demand actors put forward the "trends of the moment", "top 10" or highlight the products that seem to correspond to your tastes.

Tightening the field of possibilities

From the supermarket to the management of personal finances, we will agree, there is more than one step! Nevertheless, if we make the transposition, it appears that a too large offer of financial products and services will tend to demotivate us to take action and will favour our inertia.

Too often, the overabundance of choices in the financial field leads us to favour decisions that are easy to implement: investing in assets with which we are familiar, replicating an asset allocation, etc. It also encourages us to make default selections, those that are self-imposed and often seem natural as an extension of what has already been done, thus minimising the effort required to think things through. Lastly, the excessive supply of proposals may encourage a scattering of investments, going well beyond wise diversification, without any real structural axis: for example, an excessive number of live securities in a sotck portfolio probably no longer makes it possible to properly monitor each investment.

To facilitate our decision making process, it may therefore be preferable to narrow the field of possibilities. Instead of considering the equity market as a whole, it is for example possible to compartmentalise it by sector or nationality. Instead of being stunned by the abundance of funds in which you can invest, you can narrow the field to those the underlyings of whoch interest you (geographical area, theme, ESG (Environment, Social, Governance), etc).

As our "Behavioural Finance" section is still young, you will not be confronted with an overabundance... this is the opportunity to (re)read our previous contributions!

 


(1) « When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing?» by Sheena S. Iyengar and Mark R. Lepper, 2000

WARNING

This document is an advertisement and has no contractual value. Its content is not intended to provide an investment service, nor does it constitute investment advice or a personalised recommendation on a financial product, nor insurance advice or a personalised recommendation, nor a solicitation of any kind, nor legal, accounting or tax advice from any entity under the responsibility of Société Générale Private Banking.

The information contained herein is provided for information purposes only, is subject to change without notice, and is intended to provide information that may be useful in making a decision. Past performance information that may be reproduced is not a guarantee of future performance.

Before subscribing to an investment service, financial product or insurance product, the potential investor (i) must read all the information contained in the detailed documentation for the service or product in question (prospectus, regulations, articles of association, key investor information document, term sheet, information notice, contractual terms and conditions, etc.), in particular those relating to the associated risks; and (ii)consult his legal and tax advisors to assess the legal consequences and tax treatment of the product or service being considered. His or her private banker is also available to provide further information, to determine with him or her whether he or she is eligible for the product or service under consideration, which may be subject to conditions, and whether it meets his or her needs. Accordingly, no entity within Société Générale Private Banking can be held responsible for any decision taken by an investor solely on the basis of the information contained in this document.

This document is confidential, intended exclusively for the person to whom it is given, and may not be communicated or brought to the attention of third parties, nor may it be reproduced in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of Société Générale Private Banking. For more information, click here.

Édouard Camblain Head of strategic projects & development