Private clients Financial intermediaries

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Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France: +33 (0)1 53 43 87 00 (9am - 6pm)
Luxembourg: +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 5:30pm)
Monaco: +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland: Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact us about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address: protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Luxembourg by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

For customers residing in Italy, please contact BDO, the external provider in charge of Data Protection, by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice-branch-IT@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address: list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

Societe Generale Private Banking aims to provide you with the best possible quality of service. However, difficulties may sometimes arise in the operation of your account or in the use of the services made available to you.

Your private banker  is your privileged contact to receive and process your claim.

 If you disagree with or do not get a response from your advisor, you can send your claim to the direction  of Societe Generale Private Banking France by email to the following address: FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to: 

Société Générale Private Banking France
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

Societe Generale Private Banking France undertakes to acknowledge receipt of your claim within 10 (ten) working days from the date of its receipt and to provide you with a response within 2 (two) months from the same date. If we are unable to meet this 2 (two) month deadline, you will be informed by letter.

In the event of disagreement with the bank  or of a lack of response from us within 2 (two) months of sending your first written claim, or within 15 (fifteen) working days for a claim about a payment service, you may refer the matter free of charge, depending on the nature of your claim, to:  

 

The Consumer Ombudsman at the FBF

The Consumer Ombudsman at the Fédération Bancaire Française (FBF – French Banking Federation) is competent for disputes relating to services provided and contracts concluded in the field of banking operations (e.g. management of deposit accounts, credit operations, payment services etc.), investment services, financial instruments and savings products, as well as the marketing of insurance contracts.

The FBF Ombudsman will reply directly to you within 90 (ninety) days from the date on which she/he receives all the documents on which the request is based. In the event of a complex dispute, this period may be extended. The FBF Ombudsman will formulate a reasoned position and submit it to both parties for approval.

The FBF Ombudsman can be contacted on the following website: www.lemediateur.fbf.fr or by mail at:

Le Médiateur CS 151

75 422 Paris cedex 09

 

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF - French Financial Markets Authority) is also competent for disputes relating to investment services, financial instruments and financial savings products.

For this type of dispute, as a consumer customer, you have therefore a choice between the FBF Ombudsman and the AMF Ombudsman. Once you have chosen one of these two ombudsmen, you can no longer refer the same dispute to the other ombudsman.

The AMF Ombudsman can be contacted on the AMF website: www.amf-france.org or by mail at:

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financiers
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

The Insurance Ombudsman is competent for disputes concerning the application or interpretation of insurance contracts.

The Insurance Ombudsman can be contacted using the contact details that must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Luxembourg should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

Or by email to clienteleprivee.sglux@socgen.com and for customers residing in Italy at societegenerale@unapec.it

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 working days and provide a response to your claim within 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following:

Initially, you may wish to contact the Societe Generale Luxembourg Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Luxembourg
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Luxembourg's supervisory authority, the “Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier”/“CSSF” (Luxembourg Financial Sector Supervisory Commission):

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By email:
direction@cssf.lu

Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 working days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within a maximum of 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Secrétariat Général
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to:

sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
 

Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman: 

www.bankingombudsman.ch

 

Behavioural finance: how car journeys shed light on our brains

Just a few days before the first holidays, the long summer journeys and their inevitable traffic jams teach us a few lessons about behavioural biases.

Behavioural finance is defined by the application of psychology to finance: it thus differs from classical financial theory by considering individuals not as purely rational beings, but as being influenced by their emotions or by reasoning biases. Just a few days before the first holidays, the long summer journeys and their inevitable traffic jams teach us a few lessons about behavioural biases: "information cascade", "correlation bias" and "memory bias".

The itinerary, the typical example of the "information cascade"...

Route selection has often been used to describe mimicry bias and in particular the "information cascade".

When leaving on holiday, motorists look for the best route to take. Everyone has their own technique to gain a few precious minutes of idleness: road maps, GPS, hearsay, observations... Despite the talents of one or the other, the classic example used is likely to happen again :

You have two roads ahead of you to get to your resort by the sea. A priori, but without certainties, the map seemed to indicate that the road on the left is shorter than the one on the right. But you left quickly and without this famous map. Luckily (or not!), you are not alone and many cars seem to be heading towards the seaside as well. You have time to see a first car take the road on the right (for reminder, the longest according to your memory). A second and then a third car also rush in. When you arrive at the fork you could rely on your memory but you decide to rely on those "who seem to know". Let's then imagine that the cars in front of you have all had the same reasoning, namely to follow the one in front... and that the first driver has chosen completely at random...

This is a typical example of an informational cascade: decisions based on observing the behaviour of others without validating it as rational or relevant. A bad initial choice then leads to a cumulation of bad decisions by the other actors. The latter do not modify their choices despite the information they have or could have.

The informational cascade is regularly mentioned to explain the phenomena of stock market bubbles or crashes. In the same way, this bias facilitates certain frauds such as the Ponzi scheme, which consists in remunerating clients' investments with funds from new entrants, or, conversely, it makes it possible to ensure certain commercial successes through word of mouth (after having convinced the first clients, the others follow more easily).

Traffic jams, a situation that leaves time to create illusory correlations

They also make it possible to illustrate certain specific biases. Who hasn't had the impression of being systematically in the slowest line on the road (like at the supermarket)? This feeling sheds light on two types of bias:

  • An illusory correlation bias

Murphy's Law states that "Anything that is likely to go wrong, will go wrong". But although everyone knows that this law is absolutely unscientific and therefore unproven, individuals tend to make up illusory correlations: inventing correlations that do not exist or exaggerating weak correlations. This bias obviously gives rise to false hopes of gains in investments or poor diversification of assets.

  • Memory bias

To carry out a study on the subject (Why cars in the next lane seem to go faster?), two Canadian researchers (Donald A. Redelmeier & Robert J. Tibshirani) showed students a video of traffic jams, filmed from inside a moving car. The researchers deliberately selected a sequence in which the car is in the fastest lane. However, 86% of the students considered the sequence to be realistic, 70% felt they were in the slowest lane and 65% would have changed lanes if they were actually driving! The very negative feeling experienced when the car is overtaken therefore has more impact than that experienced by a driver overtaking another car. This study highlights the fact that it is easier to remember an unpleasant moment than a pleasant one. Translated into finance, a disappointment linked to a capital loss will remain more lasting than good performance.

Have a good trip for those who will be travelling by car and above all... have a good holiday!

Édouard Camblain Head of strategic projects & development