Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Art markets and the Covid crisis: what panorama in autumn 2020?

The Covid 19 health crisis has shaken the art markets and raises many questions, both about the impacts and prospects for art markets, dealers and auction houses, and about the reactions of collectors. Analysis by our expert Laurent Issaurat, head of the Art Banking department of our private bank.

2020, a black year for art markets

2020 will be a milestone in the history of art markets. A year in which almost all major trade fairs were cancelled; a year in which more than 90% of museums, galleries and auction houses closed their doors for two to three months, depending on the location and institution. The result was a sharp drop in sales in the second quarter for most operators, of the order of 50% to 75% compared to the same period last year.  This commercial contraction is creating cash flow tensions for many players in the art world, both in the non-commercial sector (especially museums, the revenues of which depend most on attendance) and in the commercial sector. Trade fairs have been successively postponed and cancelled and the "queen" of contemporary art fairs, Art Basel, changed control in July. In France, up to a third of galleries are said to see their existence threatened, according to Marion Papillon, president of the Professional Committee of Art Galleries. Auction houses also adjusted their staffing, structural and operating costs, as they did not escape the turmoil and saw nearly half of their sales revenue from public sales evaporate over the first half of the year, a trend that was nevertheless partially offset by the development of over-the-counter sales and online activity.

Innovate to survive

In fact, as in many other sectors of the economy and society, art markets are experiencing a tremendous acceleration of the digital switchover, which is reflected in the explosion of "viewing rooms", virtual replicas of galleries and fairs, in which visitors can not only move around from their computers, but also zoom in on works and interact with dealers remotely.  Some auction houses are taking innovation a step further, offering fully automated ("online only") public auctions, with sales volumes more than quadrupling in the first half of 2020 (aggregate figures from Sotheby's, Christie's and Phillips).  Auction houses broke new ground again in June, when Sotheby's offered the first "hybrid and global" relay auction: an event combining the firepower of its halls in Hong Kong, London and New York, intervening one after the other in a marathon sale, animated online in the manner of a big TV show. Christie's followed suit on July 10 with its "One" global sale, and the two houses achieved total sales of nearly $800 million.

A resilient demand

These figures testify to the persistent appetite of collectors, which was really noticeable from June and July onwards. It was materialized by price records or, among other examples, by the success of the Art Paris Fair at the beginning of the school year. However, the upsurge in the health crisis in September led to further cancellations of the physical fairs in the autumn of 2020 (Fiac Paris and Frieze London in October, Paris Photo in November, Art Basel Miami in December, Brafa Brussels in January 2021), whereas the 2021 editions of Tetaf, Armory Show and Art Basel will be postponed for several months.

What prospects can we draw?

In this highly volatile context, prices of quality assets seem to be holding up well for the time being, even if the horizon for a general recovery in sales is moving away again towards 2021, due to the recent tightening of health constraints, the multiple cancellations or postponements of trade fairs, and a new halt to sales in physical auction, which mark the end of the year.  All in all, we can therefore expect a sharp contraction in overall transaction volumes in 2020, probably comparable to the 35 to 40% drop recorded in 2009 in the wake of the financial crisis. Having said that, for the record, the rebound in activity was particularly strong in 2010, supported by the appetite of collectors. This reference to the previous cycle of 2008-2010 has led many analysts to expect a similar recovery profile once the health crisis is resolved. In the meantime, while good deals are always possible in fluctuating market contexts, buyers will benefit from paying more attention than ever to the quality, state of conservation and authenticity of the works proposed to them, a fortiori when transactions are carried out remotely. Moreover, this period of relative calm can be used by owners of collector's items to set up or update their inventories, in order to check the relevance of the values retained in the context of donation projects or for the calculation of their insurance premiums.

The information provided on this page is for information purposes only and has no contractual value. The content of this page is not intended to provide investment advice or any other investment service and does not constitute an offer, a personalised recommendation or advice from Societe Generale Private Banking with a view to the purchase or subscription or sale of investment services or financial products or a transaction in pleasure goods such as art. The information provided above does not constitute legal, tax or accounting advice. Societe Generale Private Banking cannot under any circumstances be held liable for any investment decision taken by a reader on the basis of this information. No Société Générale Private Banking entity undertakes to update or modify the present page and will not assume any responsibility in this respect. The wealth and financial solutions, offers, products, goods, pleasures, services and activities mentioned on this page depend on each client's personal situation, the legislation applicable to him/her and his/her tax residence. Thus the offer presented may not be implemented, adapted or authorised within all Societe Generale Private Banking entities and must comply with the Societe Generale Group's Tax Code of Conduct. In addition, access to some of these products, services and solutions is subject to eligibility conditions. We invite you to contact your private advisor to check whether these offers meet your needs and are adapted to your investor profile.

Laurent Issaurat