Private clients Financial intermediaries

Become a client

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Trends #2

Tourism, architecture, environment, design, sport, art, research... The main trends of the moment.

The DNA

Certain varieties really are the spice of life

A healthy and balanced diet, physical activity, not too much stress and even less alcohol and tobacco... All standard recommendations for a long and healthy life. However, a healthy lifestyle is not the be-all and end-all of longevity! Researchers from the University of Bologna, Italy, have discovered that in the DNA of very old people (over 105 years old) there are genetic variations that contribute to preventing mutations or repairing others, protecting their lucky carriers from some diseases associated with advancing years. Finally, longevity is like poker: a mixture of luck and strategy!

The hotel

La Mamounia in Marrakech

On the eve of its 97th anniversary, the mythical ochre palace has been taking advantage of this notable year to reinvent itself once more. After several months of work by the architectural firm Jouin Manku, the famous Marrakech hotel has unveiled a new, modernised decor, which nevertheless gives pride of place to traditional craftsmanship. The gastronomic experience has been redesigned with a tea room and an Italian bar designed by Pierre Hermé and two new restaurants run by Jean-Georges Vongerichten, the world-famous Alsatian chef.

The research

The luxury of tomorrow is invented in the laboratory

Given the ever-more ethical and sustainable demands of consumers, the whole luxury sector is reinventing itself: fur, caviar, diamonds... Brands now need to reduce their carbon footprint, preserve life, avoid animal suffering and monitor the socio-economic impact of their activity. British caviar producer Exmoor Caviar has developed a laboratory-sourced caviar that is expected to arrive on the market within two years. The French jewellery house of Courbet now uses only synthetic diamonds. Of course this does beg the question: can we really talk about “luxury” if it becomes something accessible to all?

The practice

When learning is turned into a game

Daily life would be much more animated if play was central to everything we do! Imagine a video game that asks you to put specific muscles to work as part of a physiotherapy exercise. Alternatively, you might prefer to improve your understanding of a particular period in history by taking part in a role play game, or learn to drive a forklift truck using a simulator. Known as gamification, this new learning method takes the mechanics of games and puts them in an educational context. Based on neurobiological research demonstrating the effect emotions can have on long-term memory, gamification has been shown to increase motivation and concentration during knowledge acquisition. An easier way of saying it is that we learn better through play.

Construction

A 516-metre pedestrian bridge in Portugal

In Portugal, in the municipality of Arouca, the longest pedestrian suspension bridge in the world at 516 metres, called 516 Arouca, has been inaugurated. It rises high above the Paiva River gorge, at a height of 175 metres. This astonishing construction offers a truly unique experience, which makes it a must-see tourist destination. The previous world record was held by the Charles Kuonen bridge (494 metres long in the Swiss Alps). A technical feat that marks the recovery of tourism in the region.

The word

Conso’trading

A contraction of “consumption” and “trading”, conso’trading consists of buying a highly anticipated item, such as a pair of limited edition sneakers, only to sell them later for a much higher price. A somewhat classic practice. What is less than classic is the profile of these new entrepreneurs: teenagers, sometimes minors, who are fans of brands and finance their purchases through this sometimes prosperous business model. You need to join a “cook group” on a social network to begin. Access is usually subject to a fee, but it provides exclusive information on upcoming opportunities. A new word for a new practice, conso’trading is linked to the participatory economy movement, where brands are expected to share their benefits with the community.

The office 2.0

Tokyo: Teleworking booths while waiting for the metro

Last summer, soundproofed spaces resembling photobooths appeared in the corridors of the Japanese capital’s underground system. The “CocoDesk”, designed by the multinational Fuji Xerox, welcomes users who want to nip into the office...on the way to the office! For 250 yen (about €2) per 15 minutes, they can take part in a video-conference meeting or work on a presentation, while enjoying the facilities and comfort (LCD screen, Wifi, air conditioning) of these unusual offices. This ingenious solution for making the most of one’s commuting time has already won over many Japanese white-collar workers.

The initiative

Turning oranges into electricity

Does every problem have a sustainable solution?  Maybe not for everything, but for oranges, yes! Seville is the city with the most orange trees in the world (50,000). Each year, the orange harvest employs around 200 people and 5,000 tonnes of oranges are collected. 

Some of the crop is kept for industrial processing, but most of the rest is simply thrown away. If the oranges are not harvested in time, they spill their juice onto the ground, decompose and become a real danger to passers-by. To remedy this problem, the city of Seville has come up with the idea of turning oranges into electricity, thanks to the methane given off during their fermentation. This production could meet the electricity needs of more than 25,000 households and avoid the disposal of this biodegradable waste in landfill sites.