Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Three Steps Forward,One Step Back

After rising 12.9% over the previous three weeks, the MSCI World index of global equities has shed -5.0% since Monday. This has come amidst gloomy projections from the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the US Federal Reserve (Fed). Is the economic outlook as bleak as suggested? And did this drive the weakness in equity markets?

The OECD sees a sharper recession than the International Monetary Fund (IMF) predicted back in April. It expects the global economy to shrink -6.0% this year followed by a 5.2% rise in 2021 – this means a more severe economic crisis and a slower recovery than the IMF’s forecasts of -3.9% and +5.8% in 2020 and 2021 respectively. On the OECD’s reckoning, the US economy will shrink -7.3% in 2020 and recover 4.1% next year whereas the IMF estimated -5.9% and 4.7% for the two years.
In fact, the US economy was already in recession before the coronavirus hit the United States. On Monday this week, the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) declared that the recession began in February this year, marking the end of 128 consecutive months of expansion, the longest stretch on record. This came before lockdowns began to impinge on economic activity. Indeed, the US counted only 24 confirmed cases and one death at end-February.
On Wednesday, the Fed held its regular monetary policy meeting and updated its forecasts and projections. Regarding GDP, the Fed expects a -6.5% contraction this year followed by a 5.0% pick-up in 2021 with unemployment ending this year at 9.3% and 6.5% at end-2021. Moreover, policy-makers’ individual projections for key rates (known as the “dots”) suggest no increase in rates for the next three years. This point was underlined by Fed chair Jerome Powell in his comments – he stressed that “we’re not even thinking about thinking about raising rates”. He also underlined that the Fed’s asset purchases will continue at around current levels (c.$120bn per month) for the foreseeable future – he made clear that the Fed was focused more on the impact of monetary easing on “normal people” than on asset prices.
While the Fed’s outlook is decidedly downbeat for the economy, the central bank’s view is not far-removed from the OECD and IMF forecasts. Moreover, these projections amply justify the confirmation that policy settings will remain very loose for years to come, in particular as regards asset purchases, which have been instrumental in easing financial conditions and fuelling the rally in stocks in recent weeks. So why did markets correct so sharply?
Part of the explanation may be linked to the CoViD-19 pandemic itself. Unlike many European countries, the US has not seen a meaningful decline in new confirmed cases, which have remained stuck between 20,000 and 25,000 per day since early May.
Despite the marked improvement in New York in recent weeks, a number of states across the south and west of the country have seen a worrying acceleration in cases as they have eased lockdown restrictions (see left-hand graph). With the White House urging states to get back to work, it is unlikely that the renewed spread in the virus will lead back to lockdown. But it does mean that economic activity and household spending patterns are unlikely to return to pre-crisis norms any time soon.

Bottom line. The US equity market has just registered its best 50-day performance on record (see right-hand graph). The correction this week is unlikely to be due to the Fed stance or indeed the lingering coronavirus worries – both are little changed from previous weeks. It may simply be that the rally could only be justified by a V-shaped recovery, which for now looks a rather distant prospect.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking