Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Reasons to be careful? Part 3

This week, some additional sources of volatility have crept into markets. In the US, attempts to pass a new fiscal package appeared to have failed, while in Europe, trade negotiations between the UK and EU have taken a turn for the worse. Are the risks significant, and what might be their impact on the economy and markets?

In the US, the gap between Democrat demands for over $2tn in new stimulus and Republicans’ reluctance to go above $1tn, combined with strong job data for August, appeared to have ended any chance of deal being struck before the presidential election. However, on Wednesday this week, Donald Trump called on Republicans to agree to a $1.5tn package and his staff restarted negotiations with Democrats to push a deal through.

In our view, the package is necessary. Much of the support contained in March’s Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act is set to come to an end. For example, the extra $600 per week in unemployment benefits expired at end-July and President Trump’s August executive order to pay unemployed workers $400 per week will shortly run out of cash. The 12.6 million Americans currently filing jobless claims face a cut in benefits of over 50% if Congress fails to reach agreement.

On Wednesday, Federal Reserve (Fed) chair Jerome Powell called for a new relief package for the US economy, underlining that the lack of additional fiscal support was a big downside risk to the outlook. Unemployment is still far too high and inflation – as measured by prices of core personal consumption expenditure (core PCE) – is stuck well below the Fed’s objective of an average 2% over time.

Relations between London and Brussels have deteriorated over the past week, in reaction to the introduction of a new Internal Market Bill by the UK government. This legislative initiative, if successful, would override last October’s Withdrawal Agreement in respect of the Northern Ireland protocol on state aid and customs declarations. Not surprisingly, this is viewed by the EU as a breach of international law and the European Commission has called on Westminster to abandon its plans, albeit while underlining that EU-UK talks on the future relationship should continue regardless.

The new bill has also been poorly received in the US. Both House majority leader Pelosi and Democratic presidential candidate Biden have stated that there would little chance of Congress approving a trade deal with the UK if the bill passes into law. This is because that it would imperil the Good Friday Agreement, which brought peace to Northern Ireland and which is predicated on an open, frictionless border with the Republic of Ireland.

Of course, the bill’s introduction could yet prove to be an attempt to wring extra concessions in the trade talks with Brussels. Last year’s volte-face to sign the Withdrawal Agreement may prove to be this year’s template. But undeniably, the risk that there could be no deal when the UK finally leaves the single market and customs union at year-end has risen markedly this week. The Bank of England’s economists expect that this would reduce GDP by between 2.5 and 5.5% to the end of 2024. So far however, this is not the BoE’s central scenario – indeed, yesterday’s policy meeting left rates and asset purchases unchanged.

Bottom line. In the US, President Trump’s intervention may prove sufficient to reconcile Democrat demands and Republican resistance. Nancy Pelosi has indicated approval and Senate Republicans will be reluctant to be accused of imperilling Trump’s re-election chances. However, the outcome remains highly uncertain. In the UK, the risk of a hard Brexit has risen but we still believe that pragmatism will prevail and a deal will be struck. But whatever the outcomes in the US and Europe, central banks stand ready to ease further if necessary, which would provide further support for risk assets.

Read full article

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking