Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Pushing the Boat (Further) Out

Euro zone assets have been in high demand over the past three weeks. The Euro STOXX 50 equity index is up almost 18% while the euro has risen almost 5% against the US dollar. What has spurred this rare bout of euro zone outperformance? And can it be sustained?

The main catalysts for the rally have been 1) the gradual easing of coronavirus lockdown restrictions as the number of new confirmed cases has continued to dwindle, 2) a tick higher in business confidence surveys such as the Purchasing Manager Indices, 3) the European Commission’s proposal for a €750bn EU recovery fund, 4) Germany’s new €130bn stimulus plan, and 5) the latest increase in asset purchases by the European Central Bank (ECB). The new German plan was announced on Wednesday and comes in addition to the previous €250bn support plan and a further €1,200bn in loan guarantees, delayed taxes etc., taking the total value of programmes to around 49% of German GDP. The new programme focuses more on long-term stimulus than its predecessor which aimed to help companies and households through the crisis, via measures such as Kurzarbeit income support (which covers 18% of total workforce). This week’s plan includes a cut in VAT from 19% to 16% until December, investments in growth-generating new technologies (digital, renewables and electric vehicles for example), a €300 payment per child and continued bridging support for companies. All in all, an extraordinary package for a government which is supposedly conservative on fiscal matters. The ECB’s economists have revised their economic forecasts lower – they now expect euro zone GDP to contract -8.7% this year, followed by +5.2% and +3.3% in 2021 and 2022, meaning that the euro zone economy will not recover to end-2019’s level until end-2022. Moreover, inflation is set to remain below 1% until 2022, far below the central bank’s 2% target. Such a dire outlook demanded an adjustment in monetary policy, which duly came in the form of a €600bn increase in the Pandemic Emergency Purchase Programme (PEPP) to €1,350bn, extension of its timetable by 6 months to June 2021 and announcement that reinvestment of maturing bonds will continue until at least December 2022. The ECB has already bought €235bn in the PEPP, leaving €1,115bn to buy over the next 13 months. If we include all the other ECB programmes, the average monthly run rate of purchases will be €120bn in 2020 and €106bn next year, slower than May’s €150bn pace but still well above the €80bn per month the ECB bought during the euro zone crisis. If we consider that the ECB will continue to direct three-quarters of all these planned purchases to sovereign bonds, this would mean the ECB buying a total of around €1,460bn in 2020 and 2021, more than enough to cover euro zone members’ anticipated budget deficits of €1,366bn. Moreover, by committing to reinvest the proceeds from maturing bonds, the ECB will neutralise much of the financing cost of governments’ additional debt burden for at least three years, given that it typically returns much of the coupon income received on its holdings to national treasuries. This week’s announcements sparked a marked easing of financial conditions across the euro zone. For example, the yield differential between 10-year sovereign bonds issued by Germany and Italy tightened 17bp to 174bp yesterday, taking it well below the 280bp level we saw before the PEPP was launched in March. Moreover, the euro rose a further 0.9% against the USD.

Bottom line. The decisive action from Germany and the ECB this week has further boosted risk appetite for euro zone assets. However, the economic backdrop remains dire, meaning continued headwinds for companies. Moreover, the EU still must overcome threatened vetoes from the “Frugal Four” (the Netherlands, Austria, Denmark and Sweden) against the recovery fund at the European Council summit on June 18 and 19. It may still be too early to overweight the region.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking