Private clients Financial intermediaries

Become a client

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France: +33 (0)1 53 43 87 00 (9am - 6pm)
Luxembourg: +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 5:30pm)
Monaco: +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland: Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact us about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address: protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Luxembourg by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

For customers residing in Italy, please contact BDO, the external provider in charge of Data Protection, by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice-branch-IT@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address: list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

Societe Generale Private Banking aims to provide you with the best possible quality of service. However, difficulties may sometimes arise in the operation of your account or in the use of the services made available to you.

Your private banker  is your privileged contact to receive and process your claim.

 If you disagree with or do not get a response from your advisor, you can send your claim to the direction  of Societe Generale Private Banking France by email to the following address: FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to: 

Société Générale Private Banking France
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

Societe Generale Private Banking France undertakes to acknowledge receipt of your claim within 10 (ten) working days from the date of its receipt and to provide you with a response within 2 (two) months from the same date. If we are unable to meet this 2 (two) month deadline, you will be informed by letter.

In the event of disagreement with the bank  or of a lack of response from us within 2 (two) months of sending your first written claim, or within 15 (fifteen) working days for a claim about a payment service, you may refer the matter free of charge, depending on the nature of your claim, to:  

 

The Consumer Ombudsman at the FBF

The Consumer Ombudsman at the Fédération Bancaire Française (FBF – French Banking Federation) is competent for disputes relating to services provided and contracts concluded in the field of banking operations (e.g. management of deposit accounts, credit operations, payment services etc.), investment services, financial instruments and savings products, as well as the marketing of insurance contracts.

The FBF Ombudsman will reply directly to you within 90 (ninety) days from the date on which she/he receives all the documents on which the request is based. In the event of a complex dispute, this period may be extended. The FBF Ombudsman will formulate a reasoned position and submit it to both parties for approval.

The FBF Ombudsman can be contacted on the following website: www.lemediateur.fbf.fr or by mail at:

Le Médiateur CS 151

75 422 Paris cedex 09

 

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF - French Financial Markets Authority) is also competent for disputes relating to investment services, financial instruments and financial savings products.

For this type of dispute, as a consumer customer, you have therefore a choice between the FBF Ombudsman and the AMF Ombudsman. Once you have chosen one of these two ombudsmen, you can no longer refer the same dispute to the other ombudsman.

The AMF Ombudsman can be contacted on the AMF website: www.amf-france.org or by mail at:

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financiers
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

The Insurance Ombudsman is competent for disputes concerning the application or interpretation of insurance contracts.

The Insurance Ombudsman can be contacted using the contact details that must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Luxembourg should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

Or by email to clienteleprivee.sglux@socgen.com and for customers residing in Italy at societegenerale@unapec.it

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 working days and provide a response to your claim within 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following:

Initially, you may wish to contact the Societe Generale Luxembourg Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Luxembourg
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Luxembourg's supervisory authority, the “Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier”/“CSSF” (Luxembourg Financial Sector Supervisory Commission):

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By email:
direction@cssf.lu

Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 working days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within a maximum of 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Secrétariat Général
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to:

sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
 

Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman: 

www.bankingombudsman.ch

 

Weekly Update - How deep?

This week saw publication of the latest economic projections from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) among others, which served to underline just how severe the economic fallout from coronavirus containment measures is likely to be. On the other hand, the spread of the pandemic appears to be slowing at last and some governments have begun to announce exit strategies. What does this mean for the global economy and for financial markets?

The IMF estimates that the ongoing recession will leave developed world economies with a sizeable shortfall in output by end-2021, of around 5% compared to its forecasts from last October. For 2020, the institution expects the global economy to
contract by 3.0%, led by a 6.1% fall in advanced economies with emerging markets shedding only 1.0%. This would be the
deepest recession since the 1930s, dwarfing the 0.1% decline in world GDP in 2009’s great recession. For 2021, the IMF sees a
5.8% rebound in activity, let by 6.6% pickup in the emerging world with advanced economies bouncing 4.5%.
These figures are in line with the most recent national estimates – France now expects a fall of 8% in GDP this year, while the
UK’s independent budget watchdog’s latest scenario outlines a potential 35% quarterly drop in GDP in Q2, followed by a
recovery over the subsequent 18 months. On Friday April 17, China published its Q1 GDP figures showing a 6.8% year-on-year decline in output, the first fall since 1976. The accompanying data for March showed diverging trends – industrial production was down only 1.1% YoY while retail sales tumbled 16.1% compared to March 2019. This corroborates March’s business confidence surveys across the globe which proved more resilient in manufacturing than in services.
Over recent weeks, the pandemic has shown signs of coming under control. This week, the global total of confirmed cases
reached 2 million. It took only 5 days for cases to double from 250,000 to 500,000, 8 to double again to 1 million but 13 days for the latest doubling in the total. This has emboldened governments – such as Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland this week – to begin to announce the forthcoming easing of restrictions.
However, the easing will come in several small steps, as has been the case in China. The University of Oxford has calculated a
government response stringency index for various countries. As shown on the left-hand chart, China has still not abolished the stringent measure it began to put in place in January. Indeed, faced with a resurgence in new confirmed cases, Singapore recently imposed a month’s lockdown and Japan has instituted a nationwide state of emergency. Governments in Europe and North America will need to be very prudent if they are to avoid having to follow suit.
Given the scale of the slump in activity thus far, central banks and governments have reached deep into their toolboxes to ease policy, aiming to keep financial markets operating smoothly and to mitigate the economic pain for businesses and
households. However, certain countries – like Italy and Spain in the eurozone – have suffered more than others and face
constraints on their ability to support their economies, putting downward pressure on their sovereign bond markets (see righthand chart).


Bottom line. China’s experience suggests that restrictions will remain in place for some time in Europe and the US after the
peak in the numbers of new confirmed coronavirus cases. This in turn means that governments may have to do more to foster the recovery which financial markets appear to be expecting. In this context, much rides

Read full article​​​​​​​

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking