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Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France: +33 (0)1 53 43 87 00 (9am - 6pm)
Luxembourg: +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 5:30pm)
Monaco: +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland: Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact us about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address: protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Luxembourg by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

For customers residing in Italy, please contact BDO, the external provider in charge of Data Protection, by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice-branch-IT@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address: list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

Societe Generale Private Banking aims to provide you with the best possible quality of service. However, difficulties may sometimes arise in the operation of your account or in the use of the services made available to you.

Your private banker  is your privileged contact to receive and process your claim.

 If you disagree with or do not get a response from your advisor, you can send your claim to the direction  of Societe Generale Private Banking France by email to the following address: FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to: 

Société Générale Private Banking France
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

Societe Generale Private Banking France undertakes to acknowledge receipt of your claim within 10 (ten) working days from the date of its receipt and to provide you with a response within 2 (two) months from the same date. If we are unable to meet this 2 (two) month deadline, you will be informed by letter.

In the event of disagreement with the bank  or of a lack of response from us within 2 (two) months of sending your first written claim, or within 15 (fifteen) working days for a claim about a payment service, you may refer the matter free of charge, depending on the nature of your claim, to:  

 

The Consumer Ombudsman at the FBF

The Consumer Ombudsman at the Fédération Bancaire Française (FBF – French Banking Federation) is competent for disputes relating to services provided and contracts concluded in the field of banking operations (e.g. management of deposit accounts, credit operations, payment services etc.), investment services, financial instruments and savings products, as well as the marketing of insurance contracts.

The FBF Ombudsman will reply directly to you within 90 (ninety) days from the date on which she/he receives all the documents on which the request is based. In the event of a complex dispute, this period may be extended. The FBF Ombudsman will formulate a reasoned position and submit it to both parties for approval.

The FBF Ombudsman can be contacted on the following website: www.lemediateur.fbf.fr or by mail at:

Le Médiateur CS 151

75 422 Paris cedex 09

 

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF - French Financial Markets Authority) is also competent for disputes relating to investment services, financial instruments and financial savings products.

For this type of dispute, as a consumer customer, you have therefore a choice between the FBF Ombudsman and the AMF Ombudsman. Once you have chosen one of these two ombudsmen, you can no longer refer the same dispute to the other ombudsman.

The AMF Ombudsman can be contacted on the AMF website: www.amf-france.org or by mail at:

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financiers
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

The Insurance Ombudsman is competent for disputes concerning the application or interpretation of insurance contracts.

The Insurance Ombudsman can be contacted using the contact details that must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Luxembourg should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

Or by email to clienteleprivee.sglux@socgen.com and for customers residing in Italy at societegenerale@unapec.it

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 working days and provide a response to your claim within 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following:

Initially, you may wish to contact the Societe Generale Luxembourg Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Luxembourg
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Luxembourg's supervisory authority, the “Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier”/“CSSF” (Luxembourg Financial Sector Supervisory Commission):

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By email:
direction@cssf.lu

Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 working days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within a maximum of 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Secrétariat Général
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to:

sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
 

Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman: 

www.bankingombudsman.ch

 

Weekly Update - A Game-Changer for Europe

One of the major breakthroughs over the summer months has been the July 21 conclusion of a five-day European Council summit which gave the green light to the EU recovery fund. What is the outlook now for the region’s economies? And what does this mean for markets?

In the run-up to the summit, German chancellor Angela Merkel had sounded cautious, stating that more time would probably be needed for the 27 EU members to reach agreement on the package, given the stiff resistance from the “frugal four” of Austria, Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden. However, the balance of power had shifted in favour of a deal when Merkel and French president Emmanuel Macron agreed to €500bn in grants financed by joint borrowing at their May 18 summit. Previously, Germany had espoused budget austerity and remained hostile to any form of burden-sharing. What had changed?

First, the coronavirus pandemic represented a “black swan” event – unexpected with severe  consequences – which hit all euro zone members indiscriminately. Second, weaker members like Italy and Spain, with less resources to respond, were much harder hit through no fault of their own. Third, Germany rapidly jettisoned its “schwarze null” aversion to deficit spending as COVID-19 hit, pushing through fiscal support measures representing some 8.3% of GDP. And fourth, Merkel realised that Germany would be unable to exit its deep downturn if large partners – and export markets – in Southern Europe remained mired in recession. The European Commission then built its own proposal, adding €250bn in loans to the package which was then submitted to the mid-July Council summit. In the event, the broad outlines of the proposal were approved. However, the proportion of grants was cut from €500bn to €390bn in deference to frugal four opposition. Does this matter?

Of course, the €110bn cut in grants looks like a heavy defeat for Merkel and Macron. However, we should bear in mind that the frugal four originally opposed any handouts at all. Moreover, with borrowing costs close to zero, there is little need for core euro zone countries to apply for recovery fund loans, leaving more available for periphery borrowers. In addition, the interest payable on the loans will be determined by EU borrowing costs, thereby substantially cutting interest charges versus typical issuance by Italy and Spain. Finally, the Netherlands and its allies did not win the desired veto on disbursements to countries which are slow to reform, thus reducing the conditionality which was feared by periphery borrowers. But will the package be enough? The total fund represents some 5.4% of EU GDP, but will of course be heavily skewed to benefit the periphery. Italy, for example, is likely to receive around 4.5% of its GDP in grants and an additional 5.5% in cheap loans while for Spain the totals could be 6.3% and 7.6% respectively. This represents a dramatic improvement on domestic support measures which only amount to 3.6% of GDP in Italy and 2.9% in Spain. The package should reduce the growth gap between the core and the periphery.

Beyond the direct economic impact, the recovery fund has great symbolic importance for the European Union – the bond issuance by the Commission on behalf of the EU establishes a precedent for joint borrowing, opens the path towards an eventual fiscal union and establishes a new bond benchmark for the euro zone. The skew towards the periphery should also help weaken some of the anti-EU sentiment in countries like Italy.

Bottom line. The recovery fund will be a game-changer for the region. Combined with EU members’ success in bringing the first wave of the pandemic under control and gradually reopening their economies, it should strengthen economic recovery prospects, spark further outperformance of the euro against the dollar and encourage investors to rebuild positions in euro zone equity markets.

Read full article

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking