Private clients Financial intermediaries

Become a client

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France: +33 (0)1 53 43 87 00 (9am - 6pm)
Luxembourg: +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 5:30pm)
Monaco: +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland: Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact us about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address: protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Luxembourg by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

For customers residing in Italy, please contact BDO, the external provider in charge of Data Protection, by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice-branch-IT@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address: list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

Societe Generale Private Banking aims to provide you with the best possible quality of service. However, difficulties may sometimes arise in the operation of your account or in the use of the services made available to you.

Your private banker  is your privileged contact to receive and process your claim.

 If you disagree with or do not get a response from your advisor, you can send your claim to the direction  of Societe Generale Private Banking France by email to the following address: FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to: 

Société Générale Private Banking France
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

Societe Generale Private Banking France undertakes to acknowledge receipt of your claim within 10 (ten) working days from the date of its receipt and to provide you with a response within 2 (two) months from the same date. If we are unable to meet this 2 (two) month deadline, you will be informed by letter.

In the event of disagreement with the bank  or of a lack of response from us within 2 (two) months of sending your first written claim, or within 15 (fifteen) working days for a claim about a payment service, you may refer the matter free of charge, depending on the nature of your claim, to:  

 

The Consumer Ombudsman at the FBF

The Consumer Ombudsman at the Fédération Bancaire Française (FBF – French Banking Federation) is competent for disputes relating to services provided and contracts concluded in the field of banking operations (e.g. management of deposit accounts, credit operations, payment services etc.), investment services, financial instruments and savings products, as well as the marketing of insurance contracts.

The FBF Ombudsman will reply directly to you within 90 (ninety) days from the date on which she/he receives all the documents on which the request is based. In the event of a complex dispute, this period may be extended. The FBF Ombudsman will formulate a reasoned position and submit it to both parties for approval.

The FBF Ombudsman can be contacted on the following website: www.lemediateur.fbf.fr or by mail at:

Le Médiateur CS 151

75 422 Paris cedex 09

 

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF - French Financial Markets Authority) is also competent for disputes relating to investment services, financial instruments and financial savings products.

For this type of dispute, as a consumer customer, you have therefore a choice between the FBF Ombudsman and the AMF Ombudsman. Once you have chosen one of these two ombudsmen, you can no longer refer the same dispute to the other ombudsman.

The AMF Ombudsman can be contacted on the AMF website: www.amf-france.org or by mail at:

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financiers
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

The Insurance Ombudsman is competent for disputes concerning the application or interpretation of insurance contracts.

The Insurance Ombudsman can be contacted using the contact details that must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Luxembourg should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

Or by email to clienteleprivee.sglux@socgen.com and for customers residing in Italy at societegenerale@unapec.it

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 working days and provide a response to your claim within 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following:

Initially, you may wish to contact the Societe Generale Luxembourg Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Luxembourg
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Luxembourg's supervisory authority, the “Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier”/“CSSF” (Luxembourg Financial Sector Supervisory Commission):

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By email:
direction@cssf.lu

Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 working days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within a maximum of 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Secrétariat Général
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to:

sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
 

Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman: 

www.bankingombudsman.ch

 

Weekly Update - More, more, more - from support to stimulus

In recent days, the European Central Bank (ECB) and then the US Federal Reserve (Fed) have published the minutes of their latest policy discussions against a backdrop of improving economic data. How solid is the pick-up in the economy? And what is the outlook for central bank policy?

COVID-19 infections continue to spread rapidly across many regions, in particular in Latin America, South Asia and the South and West of the United States. In parallel, economies are gradually reopening factories, offices and shops and look unlikely to
reverse track – the economic damage has already been extensive and few countries could afford another complete lockdown. In this context, we see a shift in government policies, away from income and loan support and towards recovery stimulus. What does this mean for markets?

In the UK, Chancellor Rishi Sunak unveiled a £30bn stimulus package this week, which takes total government measures to £189bn since the start of the crisis, some 9% of GDP. The package includes a payment of £1000 to companies which rehire staff
they had furloughed, a cut in VAT charged in the tourism and hospitality sector from 20% to 5% for the next six months, an increase in the threshold for stamp duty payments on home purchases from £125,000 to £500,000 and a “kickstarter” programme to pay the minimum wage to 300,000 16-24 year olds for six months from August, thereby creating a pool of free labour for companies.

In the US, the increased unemployment benefits – $600 per week in addition to state benefits of $395 on average – on offer under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economy Security act are due to expire at the end of July. Many Republicans claim that they are a clear disincentive to seeking a job – according to a University of Chicago study, 68% of unemployed workers are earning more in benefits than their previous wages – and they are unlikely to be extended. This leaves US households facing two cliffs – 1) the 18.1 million currently claiming unemployment insurance will see weekly benefits fall 60% at month-end, and 2) with jobless insurance normally lasting 6 months, workers who lost their jobs in March will lose their remaining benefits in September – which could provoke serious household solvency problems.

However, policy-makers are aware of the risks and the Senate majority leader wants Congress to complete work on a $1 trillion package (equivalent to 4.8% of GDP in addition to existing programmes amounting to 13.4% of GDP) ahead of the summer recess which begins in early August. This new package is likely to include another cheque for lower-income households, a cut in payroll taxes, tax incentives to encourage business investment and a back-to-work bonus, perhaps modelled on Sunak’s plan. The measures, taken together, should help shift the focus from support to stimulus for the recovery, with the presidential election only 16 weeks away.

The European Commission is thinking along the same lines. On the basis of an initial proposal by Angela Merkel and Emmanuel Macron, the commission has put together a €750bn recovery fund for consideration at next week’s European Council of heads
of state. There is still disagreement on how the fund should be structured – some members want grants with no strings attached, others insist on loans to be repaid – but strong support from France and Germany should ensure that a compromise will be struck, if not next week then before month-end. Beyond its impact on the economy, the fund would represent a major advance in European Union integration, increasing the attractiveness of the region to international investors.

Bottom line. Another round of complete lockdowns looks out of the question for now. With the virus still spreading and a second wave later this year still a major risk however, governments are likely to keep some restrictions in place, meaning that full
recovery from the COVID-19 recession will take many quarters. In this context, further stimulus plans along the lines of those outlined above might prove necessary. Although this should keep risk appetite high, the macro context remains challenging
which should limit upside for equity markets.

Read full article

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking