Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Covid 19 - The next phase

As described in our Q4 House Views, we are currently experiencing a second wave of COVID-19 infections across many economies. At the same time, recent macro-economic indicators have been mixed, suggesting that the easy part of the recovery from the first half recession may be behind us. And risk assets – notably global equity markets – have come under selling pressure after registering all-time highs in early September. Will the second wave have the same effect as the first? And what is the outlook for the economy and markets?

At the global level, the pandemic now registers over 34 million confirmed cases and over 1 million deaths. The first wave of infections took hold in March, followed by a plateau at around 80,000 new cases per day before the second wave unfurled across many large emerging countries, taking us to the current level of around 285,000 per day. In a number of countries in Europe, notably Spain and France, the number of daily cases is now well above the levels reached in the spring.

This has led to worries that economies might be placed back in lockdown to stem the spread of the virus. Indeed, in recent days Spain has placed tight restrictions on the Madrid region while France has instructed some large cities such as Marseilles to close many establishments which are open to the public. However, we do not believe that sweeping nationwide lockdowns will follow. There is little political appetite to provoke another deep recession, especially with large amounts of fiscal stimulus (such as France’s €100bn plan) in the pipeline – the more the economy slows, the more difficult it will be to finance the recovery plans.

Moreover, the number of hospitalisations and deaths has not followed the same pattern as last spring. At 3 and 6 per 100,000 inhabitants respectively, the number of COVID-19 patients in hospitals across Spain and France remains well below the spring peaks of 49 and 33. And at the global level, the number of deaths reached a high of around 7,000 per day in mid-April before easing lower to today’s 5,300.

There are several possible explanations for the discrepancy between infections and fatalities. Most obviously, the number of tests being performed per week has sky-rocketed since April – from 193,000 to 694,000 in Spain and from 137,000 to 1,052,000 in France – which of course has an impact on the number of positive results. Second, treatment protocols in hospitals have been improved continuously as doctors learn more about the virus. Third, the summer and early autumn in the Northern hemisphere typically see fewer respiratory illnesses like influenza and pneumonia, which can aggravate COVID-19 symptoms – it will be important to follow hospitalisation trends once the winter flu season gets underway. As infection rates and hospitalisations have ebbed and flowed and restrictions have tightened, economic activity has begun to suffer. In the US, corporate and household confidence measures remain pretty robust, but the rapid fall in weekly jobless claims over Q2 has slowed to a trickle in September. In the euro zone, there is a stark contrast between confidence in manufacturing and services. September’s Purchasing Manager Index shows manufacturing confidence at 53.7 –well above the 50-point dividing line between expansion and contraction – while the services survey has slumped to 47.6. The mixed data suggest recovery will be more sluggish from now on.

Bottom line. Given the above factors – rising infections, tighter restrictions, mixed economic data – we expect the mix of fiscal and monetary policy to remain very accommodative. Although the US Congress may not manage to agree on a new coronavirus relief bill before next month’s election, we remain convinced that the stimulus will be forthcoming by early next year. Similarly, we expect the EU’s 27 governments to ratify the €750bn recovery fund in due course. And the Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank stand ready to ease further if necessary, most probably via asset purchases. All in all, the backdrop should remain supportive for risk assets.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking