Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Changing seasons

So far this week, European equity markets have tumbled (the Euro STOXX 50 shed -2.5% and the FTSE 100 -1.7% on Thursday alone), as COVID-19 worries raised fears of a double-dip recession. In the US, the VIX index – a measure of stock volatility often dubbed the “fear gauge” – has risen each day this week on increasing positive cases and frustration at the delay in US fiscal stimulus. Have we moved directly from summer to winter? And what is the outlook for economies and markets?

Hospitalisations and intensive care unit occupancy for COVID-19 patients have begun to swell across Europe as has the proportion of tests which are positive, showing that the increase in cases is not solely due to increased testing. France now ranks third among major hotspots in terms of cases per 10,000 of population and has announced curfews in 9 major cities including Paris. The UK ranks fourth and has also tightened measures in cities like Liverpool and London, where mixing of households has been banned. The US ranks seventh but has yet to see a new surge at the national level – however, large Midwest states like Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin are now back at first wave highs.

In the euro zone, the measures announced have been carefully crafted to minimise the negative impact on the overall economy. In the main, governments have targeted hospitality (around 3.1% of pre-crisis GDP) and entertainment and leisure (some 1.3%). However, the drag on growth is likely to be muted. Activity in both areas is already depressed by reduced capacity – in restaurants or at sports events – and changes in consumer behaviour. Moreover, the new restrictions are limited in nationwide scope – only one quarter of France’s population will be affected directly by the curfews.

Government support is also set to cushion the blow to businesses and households. For example, France has suspended some tax and social security payments until year end, extended short-term work schemes, promised additional payments for the vulnerable (a €150 subsidy for some minimum welfare recipients and an additional €100 per child) and targeted aid for the sectors most affected by the curfew. Nonetheless, it is becoming increasingly likely that the fourth quarter will see a modest dip in GDP after Q3’s strong bounce in activity.

Despite outperforming expectations over the summer, it looks like winter is also coming early to the UK economy. August’s GDP figures came in well below expectations, suggesting that momentum had already begun to slow in Q3, and unemployment may surge as the government’s temporary furlough scheme is rolled back. Moreover, continued uncertainty about when – indeed, if – the new trade regime with the EU will be agreed means that many corporate investment plans have been put on hold and that export order books could suffer. This suggests that H1 2021 could still see headwinds blow, even if a last-minute deal is struck.

Over in the US, signals remain mixed regarding the mooted stimulus programme. After calling off talks with the Democrats, President Trump is now pushing for a much larger package than his Republican senators are willing to countenance. Senate majority leader McConnell says $500bn would be appropriate, the Democratic House of Representatives have voted a $2.2tn bill and the President says he is ready to go above $1.8tn. Talks continue but time is running out before the election.

Bottom line. This combination of risk factors – COVID-19 restrictions, UK/EU trade, delay to US fiscal stimulus – has weighed on market sentiment in recent days. However, we believe that governments will deepen fiscal support to alleviate problems for businesses and households and that they will avoid imposing new nationwide shutdowns. Further, we expect central banks to react quickly to any meaningful slowdown in activity by boosting and extending asset purchase programmes. Winter may be arriving early but these measures should help limit downside for global equity markets.

Read full article​​​​​​​

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking