Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Back to Trade War?

In recent weeks, the Trump administration has stepped up criticism of China’s handling of the coronavirus crisis, with the President claiming to have seen evidence that a virology laboratory in Wuhan was the source of the pathogen. This has raised fears of a further deterioration in China’s relationship with the US, less than four months after the “phase one” trade deal was signed. What does this mean for global trade and for markets?

Trump’s rhetoric regarding China has hardened in recent weeks as the US has emerged as the epicentre of the pandemic, with 1.3 million confirmed cases leading to 70,000 deaths, by far the heaviest toll thus far. The total number of active cases (after accounting for deaths and recoveries) continues to rise, reaching 1.0 million on May 7. In reaction, the President stated recently that tariffs would be the “ultimate punishment” for any Chinese misdeeds and calling on China to respect the terms of the trade deal – “now they have to buy […] and if they don’t […], we’ll terminate the deal”.
The phase one trade deal signed in mid-January included a number of commitments by China to step up imports from the US – by at least $200bn over the next two years, compared to total imports of $186bn in 2017, before the trade war began. In exchange, the US suspended planned tariffs on $160bn worth of goods and cut those on a further $120bn from 15% to 7.5%, leaving the 25% tariffs on the remaining $250bn in place. As shown on the left-hand chart, Q1 Chinese imports from the US have fallen quite a way short of the 2020 target so far, perhaps not unsurprising given the slump in global trade caused by coronavirus lockdowns.
On May 7, the US Treasury Secretary and Trade representative held a conference call with China’s Vice-Premier to discuss progress so far. Reassuringly, their joint statement stated that they fully expect to meet their obligations under the deal. However, bilateral relations are likely to remain tense – President Trump appears to want a scapegoat to deflect any criticism of his handling of the pandemic; a hard line on China is one of the few areas of agreement between Republicans and Democrats at present; and likely Democrat presidential nominee Joe Biden has criticised Donald Trump of being weak on China as we head towards November’s presidential election.
Will heightened tensions reignite the trade war? To answer the question, we should consider each side’s position. For President XI, the paramount objective is likely to be ensuring that China’s rapid rise to global pre-eminence continues. For that, he needs broad support from the population, and for that he needs to continue to provide new jobs to encourage migration from the countryside to cities. This suggests China will seek to avoid initiatives which might imperil its economic strength. Moreover, Beijing is likely to seek to keep the renminbi at stable but competitive levels, close to its current 7.08 to $1.
For President Trump, the key objective will be re-election in six months’ time. He has long viewed his chances in terms of economic strength and stock market prices. Today’s severe recession is unlikely to be recovered in time to boost his prospects but he can seek to minimise its duration, which would probably be extended by an all-out trade war. Given these elements, we believe that his rhetoric is likely to remain aggressive but that he would have little to gain by relaunching the trade war.

 

Bottom line. Trade war tensions are set to remain high but unlikely to lead to new tariffs or sanctions ahead of the presidential elections. However, the global economy remains mired in a deep recession which will continue to weigh on corporate profits and credit quality throughout this year. Volatility levels should remain above the averages of recent years.

Read full article

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking