Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking ? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data ?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim ?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Are we there yet?

Recent weeks have seen a dizzying series of announcements from central banks and governments of the measures they plan to take to mitigate the impact of the shutdowns and travel restrictions which have been put in place to combat the rapid spread of CoViD-19. In the last few days, some economic data points have come to underline just how necessary those measures were. Have financial markets fully taken the severity of the recession into account? And will the policy easing be sufficient?

Central banks were first out of the gate as they observed a rapid tightening of financial conditions as credit spreads widened and equity markets tumbled. The US Federal Reserve (Fed) cut the lower bound of its target range for rates to zero, the Bank of England (BoE) cut its base rate to the lowest level since it was established in 1694 while the People’s Bank of China (PBoC) has cut reserve requirement ratios (which limit lending capacity) for banks serving small and medium-sized enterprises.
And central banks’ appetite for asset purchases has been sharpened – the European Central Bank has launched a pandemic emergency programme taking its planned buying to over €1tn this year and has waived issuer limits; the Fed has also removed limits on its purchases, taking its total holdings from $4.2tn in late February to $5.8tn on April 1, a 40% increase in only 5 weeks; and the BoE has boosted its own programme total by 45%.
Government support has come in various forms but most programmes focus on loan guarantees and direct support for businesses, with some adding cash payments to households. In the euro zone, national programmes total over €2.02tn so far – some 17% of aggregate GDP – while we await coordinated support from the European Union for the most-affected countries.
The latest US plan reached $2.2tn – around 10% of GDP – and President Trump has already called for a separate infrastructure investment plan of $2tn.
These measures are designed to deal with the current emergency – central banks to keep liquidity flowing through financial markets, and governments to ensure businesses and households can cope with the enforced inactivity and lack of revenues – but President Trump is right that more will need to be done to pull economies out of this recession.
Already, the containment measures are exacting a heavy toll on labour markets. The last two weeks of initial jobless claims in the US have seen 10 million new applications for unemployment benefits – the previous weekly record in 1982 was only 695,000 – to be compared to total payroll employment at end-February of 152.5 million workers. In Spain, the total of workers registering for benefits in March hit 302,300 – consensus expectations were for 30,000 – adding almost 10% to Spain’s total number of unemployed workers almost overnight.
In addition, today brought the final confidence surveys of purchasing managers (known as the PMIs) for March. The euro zone composite – covering manufacturing and services – hit 29.7, far below the 50.0 level which marks the dividing line between economic expansion and contraction. In Italy, the composite PMI tumbled to 20.2, down from 50.7 in February and easily the lowest level reached in any country in the history of such surveys.

Bottom line. The US and European economies have entered what is likely to be one of the sharpest recessions in history, prompting unprecedented easing measures by governments and central banks. Recent trends in new confirmed CoViD-19 cases in Italy and Spain have raised hopes that the worst of the pandemic may be behind us, but economies still face several more weeks of shutdown and quarantine. The recovery once restrictions are lifted is likely to be gradual – as is shown in China where activity is still only around 80-85% of last year’s levels – meaning that more fiscal and budget easing may be necessary. With economic data set to deteriorate further, we continue to suggest a defensive stance in portfolio allocations.

Read full article​​​​​​​

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking