Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - 3. 2. 1. Stop...!

US lawmakers have been locked in intense negotiations for months about the size and focus of a new recovery stimulus bill. The original draft from the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives called for over $3,000 billion in new spending while the Republican-controlled Senate has been unwilling to go above $1,000 bn. Democrats are now aiming for around $2,000 bn but talks have ground to a standstill and Congress is now in recess until mid-September. Will the recovery bill ever see the light of day? And what would it mean for the economy and markets?

Recent economic data have highlighted that the recent wave of COVID-19 infections across much of the South and West of the country has begun to impinge on activity. The University of Michigan’s consumer confidence index barely budged in August and remains well below February’s levels. Regional business surveys by the Federal Reserve in New York and Philadelphia declined sharply in August. And initial weekly applications for unemployment benefits have bounced back over 1.1 million claims, cancelling last week’s improvement. Moreover, the 28.3 million Americans who were receiving some sort of unemployment benefits at end-July have been hard hit in August – the extra $600 per week in benefits from the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation scheme expired at the end of last month, leaving only State benefits which means a decline of over 60% in their incomes on average.

Against this backdrop, President Trump issued a flurry of executive orders on August 8. These include extra unemployment benefits of $400 per week for most claimants, 75% financed by tapping $44 bn from the Disaster Relief Fund, the remainder to be met by each State. However, the monthly cost of these benefits could amount to $40 bn, meaning it is unlikely that these payments will last more than a month. In addition, Trump ordered that employee payroll taxes be deferred until end-2020 for low earners (employer-side payroll taxes had already been deferred) to boost incomes for workers. However, these taxes will become due in 2021, meaning that workers and employers are likely to set the amounts aside so as to be able to meet next year’s tax bills. Given that the President’s initiatives are unlikely to provide lasting support for US households – if, indeed, they are actually implemented – much will ride on the ability of Congress to reach a compromise on the recovery bill. So far, the signs have not been encouraging.

When the House and Senate finally went into recess last week, both sides were adamant that it was now up to the other to make concessions. Moreover, little progress is likely during the two weeks of party conventions to formally appoint Biden and Trump as their candidates to contest the November 3 presidential election. This means that any breakthroughs in negotiations will have to wait until early September at best, perhaps after the Labor Day holiday on Monday September 7. And this would leave only a little more than three weeks until the end of the fiscal year on September 30 – if new spending legislation is not passed by then, the US might face a government shutdown in the run-up to the election.

Bottom line. In our view, the US economy is exhibiting signs that a new stimulus package would be welcome. Moreover, both Democrats and Republicans agree that one is necessary – they only differ on its size and focus. In addition, neither side would relish being accused of forcing a shutdown as American voters head towards the polling booths. Thus, we expect a compromise deal to be struck by late-September. In the interim, markets could remain nervous and we would expect the uncertainty to continue to put downward pressure on the US dollar.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking