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Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France: +33 (0)1 53 43 87 00 (9am - 6pm)
Luxembourg: +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 5:30pm)
Monaco: +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland: Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact us about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address: protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Luxembourg by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

For customers residing in Italy, please contact BDO, the external provider in charge of Data Protection, by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice-branch-IT@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address: list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

Societe Generale Private Banking aims to provide you with the best possible quality of service. However, difficulties may sometimes arise in the operation of your account or in the use of the services made available to you.

Your private banker  is your privileged contact to receive and process your claim.

 If you disagree with or do not get a response from your advisor, you can send your claim to the direction  of Societe Generale Private Banking France by email to the following address: FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to: 

Société Générale Private Banking France
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

Societe Generale Private Banking France undertakes to acknowledge receipt of your claim within 10 (ten) working days from the date of its receipt and to provide you with a response within 2 (two) months from the same date. If we are unable to meet this 2 (two) month deadline, you will be informed by letter.

In the event of disagreement with the bank  or of a lack of response from us within 2 (two) months of sending your first written claim, or within 15 (fifteen) working days for a claim about a payment service, you may refer the matter free of charge, depending on the nature of your claim, to:  

 

The Consumer Ombudsman at the FBF

The Consumer Ombudsman at the Fédération Bancaire Française (FBF – French Banking Federation) is competent for disputes relating to services provided and contracts concluded in the field of banking operations (e.g. management of deposit accounts, credit operations, payment services etc.), investment services, financial instruments and savings products, as well as the marketing of insurance contracts.

The FBF Ombudsman will reply directly to you within 90 (ninety) days from the date on which she/he receives all the documents on which the request is based. In the event of a complex dispute, this period may be extended. The FBF Ombudsman will formulate a reasoned position and submit it to both parties for approval.

The FBF Ombudsman can be contacted on the following website: www.lemediateur.fbf.fr or by mail at:

Le Médiateur CS 151

75 422 Paris cedex 09

 

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF - French Financial Markets Authority) is also competent for disputes relating to investment services, financial instruments and financial savings products.

For this type of dispute, as a consumer customer, you have therefore a choice between the FBF Ombudsman and the AMF Ombudsman. Once you have chosen one of these two ombudsmen, you can no longer refer the same dispute to the other ombudsman.

The AMF Ombudsman can be contacted on the AMF website: www.amf-france.org or by mail at:

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financiers
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

The Insurance Ombudsman is competent for disputes concerning the application or interpretation of insurance contracts.

The Insurance Ombudsman can be contacted using the contact details that must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Luxembourg should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

Or by email to clienteleprivee.sglux@socgen.com and for customers residing in Italy at societegenerale@unapec.it

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 working days and provide a response to your claim within 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following:

Initially, you may wish to contact the Societe Generale Luxembourg Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Luxembourg
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Luxembourg's supervisory authority, the “Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier”/“CSSF” (Luxembourg Financial Sector Supervisory Commission):

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By email:
direction@cssf.lu

Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 working days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within a maximum of 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Secrétariat Général
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to:

sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
 

Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman: 

www.bankingombudsman.ch

 

Sylvie Chokron: Giving is healthy, and it’s scientifically proven!

Pioneering spirits - Neuro-psychologist and research director at CNRS, Sylvie Chokron, talks to us about altruism.

Sylvie Chokron, neuro-psychologist and research director at the CNRS.
She is the author of Une journée dans le cerveau d’Anna, éditions Eyrolles, 2020.

For twenty years, researchers have been looking for the precise mechanism underpinning altruism. Sylvie Chokron, neuro-psychologist and director of research at the CNRS1, explains why human beings are empathetic and the beneficial effects generosity has on our brain.

Has empathy always existed in humans?

Throughout evolution, the ability to help each other has enabled humans to survive. Only cooperation and mutual aid make it possible, for example, to build dwellings in an inhospitable environment or even to hunt large prey. These prosocial2 behaviours are very much in the interest of the human species which has made it possible to perpetuate empathetic, behavioural characteristics. However, science also shows that each time a behaviour is perpetuated, it is because it is associated with pleasure in our brain, such as for food or reproduction!

What mechanism does the altruistic act trigger in the brain?

Giving money, time or even helping others releases dopamine in the brain, in the same way as when something makes us happy: laughing, listening to music, eating chocolate... We talk about the “circuit of reward” which is activated systematically, whatever the nature or the cost of the gift . This circuit is activated most strongly when giving rather than when receiving. Human beings seem to be programmed to receive more pleasure through altruism than through acquisition.

Aside from dopamine, does being generous produce any longer-term eff ects on the body?

Science is now able to prove that doing good makes us feel good. On the physiological level, altruism acts on the cardiovascular system, longevity and the immune system. The effects are also beneficial at the cognitive level, with an impact on attention, reasoning, the ability to solve problems or even on creativity and memory. Finally, from a psychological point of view, altruism leads to an improvement in mood and positive feelings overall. There is also a reduction in risky behaviour and suicidal tendencies amongst adolescents engaged in altruistic actions.

How does altruism change with age?

Babies prefer, from 3 months, to look at characters who help each other rather than characters who bicker. From early on, there is a natural helping behaviour in babies, with no expectation of reward. Thus, at 20 months, a child will even stop helping someone if they receive a reward, disconcerted by the fact that their spontaneous generosity deserves a gift ! In young children, help is therefore quite natural, spontaneous and purely altruistic. The child’s reward is no doubt ultimately constituted by the simple activation of the “reward circuit” in their brain following a good deed and the very positive, rewarding look they receive from adults. As we grow up, this natural behaviour unfortunately tends to get lost. Between the ages of 2 and 6, the child imitates helping behaviours within the family, identifying particularly with parents of the same sex, then at around 9 years old this helping behaviour declines to be at its lowest between the ages of 13 and 15 before rising again in young adults. However, while most babies are naturally altruistic, not all adults will be...

Altruism acts on the cardiovascular system, longevity and the immune system.

Can we act on this natural tendency to altruism so that it lasts over time?

Maintaining and developing this natural tendency to gratitude and generosity in children, at school, at university or in business is a crucial issue. How can we inscribe altruistic behaviour in humans over the long term? This might involve valuing the child without material reward, recalling the importance of the parental model on this particular behavioural dimension, or getting people to think about how other people can inhibit altruistic behaviour, especially in adolescence. In North America as in Europe, researchers have developed altruism-based education programmes in schools. Through roleplaying and situational games, they have demonstrated that it is possible to increase altruistic behaviour. In France, the School of Philanthropy is currently piloting philanthropy awareness programmes in middle school classes, for children from all social backgrounds. Schoolchildren choose a cause and help an association of their choice for one year. As a researcher, I study what happens before and aft er these philanthropic initiatives in terms of self-esteem and cognitive processes. The results should make it possible, I hope, to demonstrate that educating children about philanthropy also makes it possible to develop, beyond certain specifi c prosocial behaviours, additional capacities in children, such as increased well-being, language, memory and cognitive ability.

What new fields of research are there on prosocial behaviours?

Current studies are now exploring the link between altruism and cognition more closely with a central question in mind: could promoting altruism develop cognitive processes? The prospects are very exciting and could offer, for example, solutions for children with learning difficulties.


By Croisine Martin-Roland, head of philanthropic services, Societe Generale Private Banking France.

1 Centre national de la recherche scientifique
2 Prosocial behaviours are voluntary acts, directed towards others with the aim of benefiting them or improving their well-being, such as sharing, mutual aid, comfort, etc.