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You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Jean-Gabriel Levon, The pioneering spirit

Entrepreneurs who dare - Can we really feed the world on insects? French company Ynsect, a world leader in an emerging industry, is certainly betting on it. Interview with Jean-Gabriel Levon, its co-founder and vice-president - By Nathalie Picard-Simonet, economics journalist.

Short of ideas? Certainly not Jean-Gabriel Levon.

The co-founder of Ynsect, leader in insect-based ingredients, likes nothing more than to design innovative projects and embark on new adventures, especially when there is  a challenge to be met. “Creativity gives meaning to my job as an entrepreneur”, he tells us in the Parisian premises of Ynsect, close to Gare de Lyon. Going back ten years, a report from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) stirred the curiosity of Jean-Gabriel Levon and two of his high school friends, Fabrice Berro and Alexis Angot. How are we going to feed the world in 2050? The trio examined the question further  and discovered that “insects are the forgotten component when it comes to the agro-food system. Yet they are able to digest complex proteins, like those of bran (the husk of the wheat grain), in a much more efficient way than vertebrates. Adding this link in the chain makes these proteins accessible to both pets  and humans.” With his two comrades and the agronomist Antoine Hubert, Jean-Gabriel Levon created the company Ynsect in 2011. His ambition? To feed the world with the help of insects.

The solution lies in experimentation

The founders are focusing on the mealworm (Tenebrio molitor), a high-potential edible beetle larva from which three types of useful ingredient can be extracted: proteins, oils and excrement. The majority of the proteins and oils produced in this way by Ynsect go to the pet food and aquaculture sectors. But two years ago, the company was granted the necessary permissions to sell the larval excrement known as ‘frass’ as a fertiliser ‘suitable for use in organic farming’. With the acquisition of the Dutch company Protifarm at the start of the year, Ynsect is also expanding in the human food segment (sports nutrition) which should take off following approval by the European Union with the first tentative servings of insect-based foods at the human dining table, after a somewhat tortuous regulatory licensing process.

The Tenebrio molitor breeding programme at Dole in the Jura region of France is the result of many experiments. How should we take care of insects? In what light, temperature and humidity conditions should they be kept? Which foods should they be used in? And in what proportion should they be used? For supplying water to the beetles, for example, the entrepreneurs tested multiple options. It took four years of experimentation to find  the solution. “Ten years ago, the factory farming of Tenebrio molitor was unknown, anywhere in the world, explains Jean-Gabriel Levon. There was no expert who could tell us how. 

 

“ With our research partners and our R&D department, we are gradually moving the science forward. ”

We operated on an ongoing trial basis, taking our mistakes into account, and integrating them into a continuous improvement process.” Ynsect’s disruptive technologies are now protected by 300 patents, and the company is currently working on a project to gain a clearer understanding of the molitor beetle genotype. “With our research partners and our R&D department, we are gradually moving the science forward.”

It is clear that innovation and entrepreneurship are central to Jean-Gabriel Levon’s work ethic. It seems that this mindset is inherited from his family, parents and grandparents, who include a stone cutter and a steel rolling mill operator…

Having followed an elite education—École polytechnique, HEC Paris— he has all the necessary tools in engineering, strategy and business at his disposal. His first work experience as a consultant at Schlumberger led him to work in the energy sector, at the height of peak oil (2008-2010). After extensive travel around the world, Jean-Gabriel Levon wanted to finally “put his bags down” in France. By switching from energy to food, he switched from one critical global issue to another.

“At Ynsect, I put together a new team, I launched the strategy and then I recruited a more competent person to replace me and implement it.” Every six to twelve months, he asks himself the same question: “Should I stay? Or go?” But after ten years, he is no longer counting the positions he has held: president and general manager, operations director, marketing director… So if he were to undertake just one role, which would it be?

The director of the first Ynsect production facility, which opened in Dole in 2016. This experience turned out to be conclusive (1,000 tonnes produced per year, 50 employees), providing a striking demonstration of the company’s merits.

“ I see the company as a player in society, helping to build a better world. A real machine for change. ”

The world’s largest vertical farm

The Dole farm made it possible to launch the first size-optimised plant for breeding Tenebrio molitor. Under construction near the city of Amiens, this site will produce 100,000 tonnes when it is launched in 2022, then double that in 2023. At 36 metres high, it will be the largest vertical farm in the world and the first that is “carbon negative” (sequestering more CO2 than it will emit).

Up to now, 105 million euros in contracts have been signed and Jean-Gabriel Levon has taken up a new position as Chief Impact Officer, developing a climate and biodiversity strategy. “Measuring Ynsect’s environmental impact through a complete lifecycle analysis is essential. 85% of our carbon impact relates to energy and the purchase of raw materials (cereals used as bedding and food for insects).” The company has already begun its transition from fossil fuels (gas) to electricity, although not without difficulties. “In industry, we have varying but continuous needs. For now, intermittent solutions like solar or wind power are a challenge: we can’t just ‘turn the insects off!’ in a power cut.” With the TerreHa 2040 project, the company intends to reduce emissions by developing subsidiaries in the low-carbon wheat and rapeseed sectors. Among the pledges announced is the planting of 1,700 km of hedges across 1,100 farms. Over the last ten years, sustainability has become central to the firm’s strategy. “We want to feed the world in a sustainable way”, explains Jean-Gabriel Levon, citing, in addition to Ynsect’s green credentials, their social activism, with a base salary 35% higher than the minimum wage, paternity leave of ten weeks and stock options for employees. The co-founders have even enshrined its position on societal and environmental impact in Ynsect’s Articles of Association. “This allows us to refuse a project that is motivated solely by profit. I see the company as an actor in society, helping to build a better world. A real machine for change, if you will.”

“Building a smile, a bond, and enthusiasm”

His vision goes hand in hand with a planetary ambition: “Our contribution will only be meaningful if we reach global volumes. We intend to set up dozens of factories modelled on the vertical farm in the large cereal producing regions (Europe, South-East Asia, North America), where our raw material is located.” Jean-Gabriel Levon considers insects as one solution among others. “I believe in a regional resilience based on a mosaic of practices: insects, peas, algae…” He also sees his own future as a mosaic of many different business and personal projects driven by the unifying desire to inject more humanity into everything he does. “Building a smile, a bond and enthusiasm: providing decent living conditions for all humanity. Regret is a useless emotion. So you have to believe in the future and move on.”

With your feet on the ground … and your head in the stars? “Space is an extraordinary field of experimentation! Technology deployed in vertical farms and systems automation in a controlled atmosphere could ensure food production in space. Today, this is still something of a dream but we are always looking out for opportunities.” Certainly each day is a pristine page waiting to be written!