Private clients Financial intermediaries

Become a client

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 5:30pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact us about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address: protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Luxembourg by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

For customers residing in Italy, please contact BDO, the external provider in charge of Data Protection, by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice-branch-IT@socgen.com

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address: list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

Societe Generale Private Banking aims to provide you with the best possible quality of service. However, difficulties may sometimes arise in the operation of your account or in the use of the services made available to you.

Your private banker  is your privileged contact to receive and process your claim.

 If you disagree with or do not get a response from your advisor, you can send your claim to the direction  of Societe Generale Private Banking France by email to the following address: FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to: 

Société Générale Private Banking France
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

Societe Generale Private Banking France undertakes to acknowledge receipt of your claim within 10 (ten) working days from the date of its receipt and to provide you with a response within 2 (two) months from the same date. If we are unable to meet this 2 (two) month deadline, you will be informed by letter.

In the event of disagreement with the bank  or of a lack of response from us within 2 (two) months of sending your first written claim, or within 15 (fifteen) working days for a claim about a payment service, you may refer the matter free of charge, depending on the nature of your claim, to:  

 

The Consumer Ombudsman at the FBF

The Consumer Ombudsman at the Fédération Bancaire Française (FBF – French Banking Federation) is competent for disputes relating to services provided and contracts concluded in the field of banking operations (e.g. management of deposit accounts, credit operations, payment services etc.), investment services, financial instruments and savings products, as well as the marketing of insurance contracts.

The FBF Ombudsman will reply directly to you within 90 (ninety) days from the date on which she/he receives all the documents on which the request is based. In the event of a complex dispute, this period may be extended. The FBF Ombudsman will formulate a reasoned position and submit it to both parties for approval.

The FBF Ombudsman can be contacted on the following website: www.lemediateur.fbf.fr or by mail at:

Le Médiateur CS 151

75 422 Paris cedex 09

 

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF - French Financial Markets Authority) is also competent for disputes relating to investment services, financial instruments and financial savings products.

For this type of dispute, as a consumer customer, you have therefore a choice between the FBF Ombudsman and the AMF Ombudsman. Once you have chosen one of these two ombudsmen, you can no longer refer the same dispute to the other ombudsman.

The AMF Ombudsman can be contacted on the AMF website: www.amf-france.org or by mail at:

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financiers
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

The Insurance Ombudsman is competent for disputes concerning the application or interpretation of insurance contracts.

The Insurance Ombudsman can be contacted using the contact details that must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Luxembourg should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

Or by email to clienteleprivee.sglux@socgen.com and for customers residing in Italy at societegenerale@unapec.it

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 working days and provide a response to your claim within 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following:

Initially, you may wish to contact the Societe Generale Luxembourg Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Luxembourg
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Luxembourg's supervisory authority, the “Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier”/“CSSF” (Luxembourg Financial Sector Supervisory Commission):

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By email:
direction@cssf.lu

Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 working days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within a maximum of 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Secrétariat Général
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to:

sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
 

Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman: 

www.bankingombudsman.ch

 

Hope is my outlook

Entrepreneurs who dare - Dr Richard Tipper, Ecometrica Chairman, is someone endeavouring to make a real difference to climate change. Rightfully cited as an innovator and environmental action pioneer, DrTipper is inspiring a positive shift for the planet. By Stéphanie Livingstone, journalist.

Dr Richard Tipper hasn’t been wasting any time when it comes to devoting his life to tackling climate change. Dr Tipper is currently the co-founder and Chairman of Ecometrica, an environmental monitoring solutions company. He previously worked as a science and policy adviser on climate change issues for major businesses, international organisations, and governments. He is the instigator of one of the most successful community carbon- capture programmes there was a lot of interest in food production and how developing countries would feed themselves. I wanted to know more about this, so I decided to study Agricultural Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. I was more interested in the human, rather than the environmental, side of things.”

Chiapas, Mexico: where it all started

Dr Tipper’s first professional experience as an adviser to farmers’ organisations in Chiapas, Mexico, was certainly a career game changer. He was able to work in one of the most diverse places in the world, from a cultural and ecological perspective, and he worked directly for farmers rather than through a government project. “I was employed by a local cooperative to help address coffee improvement processes”, he recalls. “However the project was not entirely successful due to economic and organisational issues. This convinced me to conduct further research on the economics of contemporary Mayan farmers for a PhD at the University of Stirling. More importantly, it made me a lot more determined to stay connected to this fascinating region and to see how I could improve rural livelihoods and people’s prospects, while at the same time looking after the environment.”

 

I wanted to take initiatives to improve rural livelihoods and people’s prospects and look after the environment at the same time.

Supporting climate-sensitive communities

Dr Tipper kept his promises. In 1994, driven by the desire to help local communities at the forefront of the climate crisis, he created Plan Vivo, a tree-planting scheme. Plan Vivo, which was revolutionary for its time, generated the world’s first carbon credits and is now one of the most successful and long-standing community carbon capture programmes based on reforestation and sustainable forests. “The government-funded carbon capture forest projects were inefficient”, he says. “Our idea was to offer sustainable livelihoods for communities, whose environments were degraded, in the form of carbon benefits to fund their land-management improvement operations. Our method succeeded because it was not imposed by the government and also because it structured the relationship between peoples’ interest in financing the sequestration of carbon versus people needing to plan their land use.” Plan Vivo is still running and has, to date, captured 3.5 million tons of CO2 from the atmosphere, benefiting 16,000 smallholders.

Dr Richard Tipper

“As with the health crisis, a lot of environmental damages pile up on the most disadvantaged people. Keeping society from fragmenting into different groups and interests is a real challenge.”

Monitoring climate change impacts

This great achievement didn’t stop Dr Tipper from continuing innovative actions to curb the climate emergency. For him, one of the best ways to help governments and companies tackle climate change issues more efficiently was to provide them with monitoring solutions. Having worked for the Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Management on carbon accounting, he decided to set up Ecometrica, his own company in 2008, to develop more efficient accounting methods on a much wider scale. The Edinburgh-born company helps governments and businesses map and track their impact on natural assets using data from satellites and drones. “We are not here to tell our clients how to improve their footprint”, explains Dr Tipper. “We try to help organisations set up systematic ways of monitoring and accounting, in order to provide a backbone of what the current status and the projection of their impact on natural assets will be. It’s like a financial accounting system.” And it works! From setting up business travel policies, switching to different fuels, or incentivising senior staff to achieve their environmental targets, a host of companies have adopted concrete actions to improve their carbon footprint, based on Ecometrica’s solutions.

Remaining optimistic

What really stands out with Dr Tipper, compared to a typical alarmist environmentalist, is his hope for the future. He is confident that society will be able to adapt to climate change. For him, environmental management has improved over the past decade and things are going in the right direction. But he is aware that there is always the potential for things to take a u-turn. He saw this during the last financial crisis: things seemed to be going greener up to 2008 until the financial crisis put a stop to it all. With the current health crisis, many companies are understandably focused on survival rather than on their green initiatives. The COP 26 has also been delayed by a year. Dr Tipper says that what is interesting this time is that governments seem to be using green-based financing and green recovery as part of the recovery agenda. “I fully acknowledge the important role that governments need to play”, he explains. “People are frustrated about the time it takes for regulations to be set in place, but they should understand that governments have a lot of priorities and they need to consult, consider, and get legislation right. I believe that the solution lies in a combination of private and public sector regulations.”

While Dr Tipper is optimistic about society’s ability to adapt environmentally, he sees climate change as a major threat to our democracy, government models and values. “As with the health crisis, environmental damages pile up on certain groups in society – usually the most disadvantaged people. It will be difficult to keep society from fragmenting into different groups and interests and to maintain unified action. This is the real challenge for me.”

Going further

When asked if he dreams of a “better world” in which resources are perfectly managed, Dr Tipper replies: “Hope is my outlook”. He believes that you can go very far with a lot of work and patience. He is confident for the future and is relying on the younger generation which he believes to be smart and kind. And don’t expect Dr Tipper to spend the next decade working “simply” as Ecometrica’s Chairman: since lockdown, he has been working on a new project called the “Resilience Constellation”. The project aims to establish an investment fund to help businesses and governments finance the data they need to adapt to climate change and make their systems more resilient. “Often, a lack of funding is an obstacle to implementing actions or developing monitoring systems”, he says. “So, if we provide the necessary funds then that’s one less obstacle removed from the equation!”

We are Ecometrica by Ecometrica – Corporate movie