Private clients Financial intermediaries

Become a client

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France: +33 (0)1 53 43 87 00 (9am - 6pm)
Luxembourg: +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 5:30pm)
Monaco: +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland: Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact us about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address: protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Luxembourg by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

For customers residing in Italy, please contact BDO, the external provider in charge of Data Protection, by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice-branch-IT@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address: list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

Societe Generale Private Banking aims to provide you with the best possible quality of service. However, difficulties may sometimes arise in the operation of your account or in the use of the services made available to you.

Your private banker  is your privileged contact to receive and process your claim.

 If you disagree with or do not get a response from your advisor, you can send your claim to the direction  of Societe Generale Private Banking France by email to the following address: FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to: 

Société Générale Private Banking France
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

Societe Generale Private Banking France undertakes to acknowledge receipt of your claim within 10 (ten) working days from the date of its receipt and to provide you with a response within 2 (two) months from the same date. If we are unable to meet this 2 (two) month deadline, you will be informed by letter.

In the event of disagreement with the bank  or of a lack of response from us within 2 (two) months of sending your first written claim, or within 15 (fifteen) working days for a claim about a payment service, you may refer the matter free of charge, depending on the nature of your claim, to:  

 

The Consumer Ombudsman at the FBF

The Consumer Ombudsman at the Fédération Bancaire Française (FBF – French Banking Federation) is competent for disputes relating to services provided and contracts concluded in the field of banking operations (e.g. management of deposit accounts, credit operations, payment services etc.), investment services, financial instruments and savings products, as well as the marketing of insurance contracts.

The FBF Ombudsman will reply directly to you within 90 (ninety) days from the date on which she/he receives all the documents on which the request is based. In the event of a complex dispute, this period may be extended. The FBF Ombudsman will formulate a reasoned position and submit it to both parties for approval.

The FBF Ombudsman can be contacted on the following website: www.lemediateur.fbf.fr or by mail at:

Le Médiateur CS 151

75 422 Paris cedex 09

 

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF - French Financial Markets Authority) is also competent for disputes relating to investment services, financial instruments and financial savings products.

For this type of dispute, as a consumer customer, you have therefore a choice between the FBF Ombudsman and the AMF Ombudsman. Once you have chosen one of these two ombudsmen, you can no longer refer the same dispute to the other ombudsman.

The AMF Ombudsman can be contacted on the AMF website: www.amf-france.org or by mail at:

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financiers
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

The Insurance Ombudsman is competent for disputes concerning the application or interpretation of insurance contracts.

The Insurance Ombudsman can be contacted using the contact details that must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Luxembourg should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

Or by email to clienteleprivee.sglux@socgen.com and for customers residing in Italy at societegenerale@unapec.it

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 working days and provide a response to your claim within 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following:

Initially, you may wish to contact the Societe Generale Luxembourg Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Luxembourg
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Luxembourg's supervisory authority, the “Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier”/“CSSF” (Luxembourg Financial Sector Supervisory Commission):

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By email:
direction@cssf.lu

Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 working days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within a maximum of 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Secrétariat Général
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to:

sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
 

Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman: 

www.bankingombudsman.ch

 

Heritage Reflections

Wealth engineering very often allows the definition of a wealth strategy for clients on their short- or medium-term wealth objectives. This is a privileged moment that requires time to set out their ideas and listening on the part of our engineering teams. This equation, time and listening, comes up according to the events and moments in their lives.

Frédéric Valentin, Head of Wealth Structuring & Planning for Societe Generale Private Banking Luxembourg, Monaco and Switzerland

Pierre-Frédéric Stein, Head of Development and Wealth Planning, Societe Generale Private Banking Luxembourg

A privileged moment

Listening is an essential element in the relationship with clients. It is essential to fully understand their objectives and philosophies. It enables them to implement, with full knowledge of the facts and in a successful manner, the wealth strategy that they have chosen with their advice.

Wealth strategy

A true "bedside book", it represents the fruit of the clients' exchanges with their advisors and usual contacts within the bank, charting the course for the coming years.

Depending on the objectives they expressed, it is articulated around several strategic axes such as, for example, the comfort of life, transmission (possibly transgenerational), capital preservation, support for generations, governance of the family group, geographical location, diversification of assets (including art), philanthropy, matrimonial regimes, international successions..

Each of these areas shall be approached by taking into account the regulations in force.
We propose to address here some typical strategic axes.

Living standards

Let us take the example of a manager, who owns his business, which he sells. After the sale, his income will decrease, he will receive neither salaries nor dividends. In order to maintain a comfortable life, one or more additional income will be necessary.

Several possibilities are open, including the investment of the proceeds in a life insurance package or capitalisation contract. Successive surrenders could make it possible to generate additional income and thus maintain the comfort of life. The collection of property income, such as rental income, or even a trade-off between property income and interest from a life insurance policy may also make it possible to create the additional income sought.

But the sale of the company, in the presence of children, may also be an opportunity to begin the transfer of its assets by transferring the company's shares before they are sold.

Preservation of family cohesion

The preservation of family cohesion is a recurring theme when developing a heritage strategy.
Family governance addresses a number of issues such as the organisation of the assets of future generations, with or without the involvement of the shareholders in the management and development of the company and its group. It is not uncommon for the suggestion of setting up a holding company called a family branch wealth management company to be adopted in order to preserve the legal independence and distribution policy of the group.
This organisation makes it possible to reflect, in a second stage, on the wealth strategies of each branch, which are financially independent of each other.
Specialized family governance consultants assist clients in their reflections.

Considering foreign elements

The possible current international dimension of the client and their family must be taken into account in order to come up with a strategy that is adapted and sustainable, that stands the test of time and life changes.

Does the manager selling their company envisage redeployment in different countries? The geographical location of the country or countries to be chosen, as well as their legislative and regulatory framework, will have to be included in the analysis.

Do family members reside in different countries, or do some of them not rule out changing their country of residence in the long run?
Such a situation will have to be integrated into the criteria for selecting a suitable vehicle for the implementation of effective family governance. For example, the choice of vehicles of Anglo-Saxon (common law) inspiration may prove to be a delicate application in countries with other legal bases.

In another register, the choice of a “Société Civile Immobilière” to conduct real estate investments is a simple solution in a French environment, but may prove unsuitable when certain family members live or plan to settle in a country where this regime is not recognized.

French tax resident clients wishing to begin the transmission of their assets to their non-resident children will have to ask themselves the question of the treatment in their children's state of tax residence of the shared gift under French law that they wish to make. This option of giving and sharing, in the same notarial deed, is a suggestion to be used with caution in the presence of foreign elements.

Similarly for married children who have changed tax residence, the question of the matrimonial property regime will have to be addressed and integrated into the analysis, particularly in the light of the EU Regulation EU 2016/1103.

Asset diversification

The wealth strategy chosen by the client will condition the choice of financial envelopes and asset allocation, a choice to which the bank can contribute through its wealth engineering department with a private banker and/or a manager.