Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking ? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data ?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim ?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Covid-19 – Continuing Risk Reduction

As the coronavirus pandemic has continued to gather pace across the globe, financial markets have come under heavy selling pressure, with global equities falling into a bear market and yield differentials on High Yield bonds in Europe spiking 360 basis points (bps) above their January lows.

As the coronavirus pandemic has continued to gather pace across the globe, financial markets have come under heavy selling pressure, with global equities falling yesterday into a bear market and yield differentials on High Yield bonds in Europe spiking 360 basis points (bps) above their January lows. Official statements, such as President Trump's press conference on Wednesday and the ECB meeting yesterday, have not proved successful in stabilising markets – indeed the downturn gathered pace yesterday afternoon. What is the outlook for the global economy and markets? As shown on the left-hand chart below, new daily confirmed cases of Covid-19 infection continue to rise sharply internationally. Moreover, some 40% of all cases outside China have occurred in just three countries (Italy, Iran and South Korea) leaving investors worried that many other nations will experience the same trends in coming weeks. So far, the daily rate of increases in new confirmed cases has only slowed marginally in Italy, from 27% at end February to 21% yesterday. In China itself, the draconian restrictions imposed in February seem to have borne fruit – the total number of new cases reported yesterday was only 20. In South Korea too, the outbreak appears to be waning with a daily increase in new cases yesterday of 1.4%, down from 35% at end February. These trends suggest that measures of lockdown, travel restrictions, quarantine etc. can be successful in containing the spread of the coronavirus. However, they do exert a heavy economic toll. Monetary authorities have continued to ease policy to ensure adequate functioning of financial markets during the crisis. On Wednesday, the Bank of England cut interest rates by 50bps to 0.25%. And yesterday, both the European Central Bank and the US Federal Reserve eased. The Fed announced a substantial increase in the size of forthcoming repurchase operations and that it would now include longer-dated Treasury bonds in its $60bn programme of monthly purchases of short-term bills. The ECB announced a series of measures: 1) temporary financing operations offering cheaper money until June; 2) more favourable terms on targeted financing operations starting in June with a funding rate as low as 25bps below deposit rates, and 3) an envelope of €120bn of additional asset purchases, which is likely to target mainly corporate bonds. However, interest rates were not cut and Mme Lagarde’s comments were taken as negative for yield differentials in euro zone periphery bonds – both factors contributed to yesterday’s sell-off. Governments have also begun to swing into action. Wednesday’s UK budget included a £12bn increase in spending to combat the coronavirus. Germany’s ruling coalition announced yesterday that it was ready to ditch its long-standing commitment to a balanced budget. And yesterday evening, in addition to measures such as closing all schools and universities, President Macron announced that France was calling for concerted action by the European Union, the G7 and the G20. The fall in equity markets has brought global indices back to December 2018’s lows, thus cancelling all of last year's strong performance. However, even after the recent sell-off, global equity markets have still registered substantial positive performance over the past ten years, up around 155% since March 2009.

Bottom line. The newsflow is likely to remain negative over coming weeks, given the continued spread of the coronavirus and the implementation of strong measures such as lockdowns and quarantines in an increasing number of countries. As a result, we suggest continuing the reduction of exposure to risk assets in diversified portfolios, by way of steady adjustments to allocations in order to increase cash holdings in portfolios. This will enable investors to take full advantage of the opportunities which this crisis will undoubtedly present in due course.

Read full article​​​​​​​

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking