Private clients Financial intermediaries

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Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Central banks toughen tone; financial markets shake

Discover the weekly economic outlook of our Investement Strategy team.

A week dominated by increasingly hawkish central bank statements. The ECB set the tone, surprising the markets by pre-announcing the start of a series of interest rate rises and the end of all asset purchase programmes. The Federal Reserve then raised its Funds rate by an unexpected 75 bp – its biggest single hike for more than 28 years. The Bank of England followed suit with a more predictable 25 bp base rate rise and has now tightened policy by 125 points since December. Finally, even the Swiss National Bank pitched in, raising its policy rate 50 bp this week. This string of announcements triggered a major correction in all financial markets. Bond markets dropped -3% in a week (Bloomberg Global Aggregate Index) in the wake of the interest rate rises. From 8 June, equity markets joined the retreat, losing 11% in the US and Euro area, 9% in the UK and 6% across emerging markets (MSCI indices) (Chart 1).
 
Willing to trigger recession? The more hawkish tone struck by central banks raises fears they may be willing to contemplate recession if it will ultimately rein in inflation. There is no doubt they are increasingly worried about inflation. The adjective “transitory” has been dropped following successive shocks that show no sign of abating. Monetary authorities see economies holding up despite these shocks and worry that price pressures may lock in. It would now take a major fall in the inflation figures to stay in their hand. Short term, we could see such a fall if oil prices drop, but this is hard to imagine in the new geopolitical environment. A real easing of pressure on production chains could have the same effect, but this looks equally unlikely, particularly as Chinese lockdowns continue to drag on. The last solution would be a decline in global demand, and this could be deliberately engineered by tightening monetary policy. This is the recession scenario which markets are now pricing in. 
 
Financial stability at risk. The rise in interest rates is worrying not only because of its effect on the economy but also because it might impact financial stability. The Covid crisis led to a fresh surge in levels of indebtedness. True, there was also an expansion of liquidity which should limit the risks, at least in the short term. But some classes of economic agents could soon find themselves in trouble. As we saw with the heavy pressure on Euro area sovereign debt markets this week (Chart 2). On this occasion, the ECB came out all guns blazing to deal with the problem, but situations may arise where this is not the case.
 
Also, in the main events of the week, we chose to talk about fragmentation fears in the Euro area and about the tightening of the Swiss monetary policy.

 

Read full article

Juan Carlos Mendoza Diaz Economist and Strategist Societe Generale Private Banking