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Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Could the Chinese yuan act as the main international reserve currency?

Discover the weekly economic outlook of our Investement Strategy team.

The question of where China's currency fits in the global financial architecture is again a live issue for debate. Questions are being asked as to whether the currency - the renminbi (RMB) or yuan - could work as a reserve currency alongside or perhaps instead of the US dollar (USD). Various arguments are put forward. First, China now generates 18% of global GDP compared to the USA’s 15% (measured at parity purchase power), and represents 14% of international trade, against 10% for the USA. This is why the IMF has, since 2016, included the RMB in the basket of currencies used to determine the exchange rate of special drawing rights. Additionally, sanctions against the Russian Central Bank and, more generally, the United States’ willingness to use financial sanctions as a weapon have led some countries to increase the share of RMB in their central banks reserve allocation and develop trade deals settled in RMB.
 
Nevertheless, we do not think the RMB, in its current or digital form, will replace the dollar as the world’s main reserve currency in coming years. Despite its ‘weaponisation’ (freezing of dollar assets, throwing countries out of SWIFT, extra-territorial rules on dollar assets), currently there is no alternative to the USD as the main international reserve currency. For one thing, any country aspiring to have a reserve currency has to run persistent current account deficits in order to supply the rest of the world's demand for its currency (a country running a trade deficit is said to be exporting its currency). At the moment, only the United States can play this role (Chart 1). China's balance of trade remains firmly in the black and we cannot see it turning lastingly red in the medium term.
 
Another reason why the USD will remain the world's reserve currency for the next few years is that it enjoys strong ‘network effects’, basically deep and open capital markets, the institutional capacity (via the Federal Reserve) to act as lender of last resort and a key role in the financial services used by the rest of the world. Network effects explain why the USD is far and away the most popular currency used in commercial and financial transactions  (Chart 2), even between non-American counterparties. As China's capital account remains closed, foreign investors find it hard to access RMB-denominated assets on the scale required. As long as China maintains substantial capital controls, outside investors and central banks will worry less about the dollar's theoretical ‘sanctions risk’ than about major political uncertainty in China. The restructuring of the Evergrande group's debt offers a case in point, raising the possibility that foreign creditors will end up losing more than home-grown creditors.

Also, in the main events of the week, we chose to talk about the EU's proposal to cut oil supply from Russia and the recent fall in US equity markets.
 

Read full article

Clémentine Gallès Chief Economist and Strategist Societe Generale Private Banking