Private clients Financial intermediaries

Become a client

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - French elections: fears of resurgent political risk in the Euro area

Discover the weekly economic outlook of our Investement Strategy team.

Doubts resurface ahead of first round of voting. The victory of Emmanuel Macron at the presidential elections seemed until recently pretty certain, but recent polls show signs of a shrinking gap. The possibility that another candidate might win has increased financial markets volatility. The French equity market has fallen in recent days and Euro area sovereign bond markets - including France - have seen their spreads widen over the German benchmark. The widening has been modest so far, but still enough to reawaken in investors’ minds the not-so-distant debt crisis among Euro area periphery countries. Uncertainty around the French election reminds everyone of the fragile nature of Europe's political balancing act, which the Ukraine war could either help steady or rattle further.

 The Ukraine war has sent Euro area household confidence plummeting (chart 1). The fall is similar in scale to that seen in the first Covid lockdown. Then, the economic outlook was highly uncertain but confidence was gradually restored by decisive and coordinated political action across the zone, echoed by similar measures in all developed economies. Major stimulus packages were rolled out to stop companies going under, shore up household incomes and keep monetary conditions highly accommodative. Today, the war raises new economic uncertainties, with households feeling the direct impact of rising commodity prices. While we have heard some major political announcements to address this, the messaging seems to be less strong and less consistent across different Euro area countries.

The signal from the French elections should be a red flag to all Euro area authorities. Recent doubts surrounding the French presidential election notably reflect the slump in confidence among French households in the new economic environment. But, the French economy has actually been exceptionally resilient so far. It remains the first European country to have got back to pre-Covid levels of production. French households have seen the strongest growth in their real incomes thanks to a dynamic labour market and inflation that is well below that of neighbouring countries (chart 2). France's inflationary exception (5.2% in March, compared to 7.6% in Germany, 7% in Italy and 9.8% in Spain) reflects an energy mix that is less vulnerable to price rises (thanks to the importance of nuclear energy) and bigger state subsidies (either direct or via state-owned power utility EDF). This does not mean French citizens have nothing to fear from the economic environment, particularly as these subsidies come out of already high levels of public debt. But it is a warning sign that if French citizens are worried and willing to vote their concerns, we have reason to fear a reaction in neighbouring countries whose economies are, at the moment, looking a lot less favorable.

Also, in the main events of the week, we chose to talk about the minutes of the ECB's and Fed's mid-march meeting.

Read full article

Clémentine Gallès Chief Economist and Strategist Societe Generale Private Banking