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Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France: +33 (0)1 53 43 87 00 (9am - 6pm)
Luxembourg: +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 5:30pm)
Monaco: +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland: Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact us about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address: protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Luxembourg by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

For customers residing in Italy, please contact BDO, the external provider in charge of Data Protection, by sending an email to the following address: lux.dpooffice-branch-IT@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address: list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

Societe Generale Private Banking aims to provide you with the best possible quality of service. However, difficulties may sometimes arise in the operation of your account or in the use of the services made available to you.

Your private banker  is your privileged contact to receive and process your claim.

 If you disagree with or do not get a response from your advisor, you can send your claim to the direction  of Societe Generale Private Banking France by email to the following address: FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to: 

Société Générale Private Banking France
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

Societe Generale Private Banking France undertakes to acknowledge receipt of your claim within 10 (ten) working days from the date of its receipt and to provide you with a response within 2 (two) months from the same date. If we are unable to meet this 2 (two) month deadline, you will be informed by letter.

In the event of disagreement with the bank  or of a lack of response from us within 2 (two) months of sending your first written claim, or within 15 (fifteen) working days for a claim about a payment service, you may refer the matter free of charge, depending on the nature of your claim, to:  

 

The Consumer Ombudsman at the FBF

The Consumer Ombudsman at the Fédération Bancaire Française (FBF – French Banking Federation) is competent for disputes relating to services provided and contracts concluded in the field of banking operations (e.g. management of deposit accounts, credit operations, payment services etc.), investment services, financial instruments and savings products, as well as the marketing of insurance contracts.

The FBF Ombudsman will reply directly to you within 90 (ninety) days from the date on which she/he receives all the documents on which the request is based. In the event of a complex dispute, this period may be extended. The FBF Ombudsman will formulate a reasoned position and submit it to both parties for approval.

The FBF Ombudsman can be contacted on the following website: www.lemediateur.fbf.fr or by mail at:

Le Médiateur CS 151

75 422 Paris cedex 09

 

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF - French Financial Markets Authority) is also competent for disputes relating to investment services, financial instruments and financial savings products.

For this type of dispute, as a consumer customer, you have therefore a choice between the FBF Ombudsman and the AMF Ombudsman. Once you have chosen one of these two ombudsmen, you can no longer refer the same dispute to the other ombudsman.

The AMF Ombudsman can be contacted on the AMF website: www.amf-france.org or by mail at:

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financiers
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

The Insurance Ombudsman is competent for disputes concerning the application or interpretation of insurance contracts.

The Insurance Ombudsman can be contacted using the contact details that must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Luxembourg should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

Or by email to clienteleprivee.sglux@socgen.com and for customers residing in Italy at societegenerale@unapec.it

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 working days and provide a response to your claim within 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following:

Initially, you may wish to contact the Societe Generale Luxembourg Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Luxembourg
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Luxembourg's supervisory authority, the “Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier”/“CSSF” (Luxembourg Financial Sector Supervisory Commission):

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By email:
direction@cssf.lu

Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 working days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within a maximum of 30 working days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-working day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address: 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Secrétariat Général
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to:

sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
 

Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman: 

www.bankingombudsman.ch

 

Personal Finance and Football: Using the “beautiful game” to avoid shooting yourself in the foot

Behavioural finance is defined by the application of psychology to finance: it differs from classical financial theory by considering individuals not as purely rational beings, but influenced by their emotions or by reasoning biases.

Whether you are a football fan or not, this November, it will be hard to escape the World Cup news. In addition to the sporting virtues of this discipline, it offers us an interesting reading key for the management of our personal finances, especially when it comes to shots on goals happening at the end of some matches.

Goalie or personal finance custodian: finding similarities

Football goal shootings are of great interest to financial psychology researchers because of their similarities to financial decision-making. Indeed, in both cases, whatever the preparation work - for some, watching previous matches of the opposing team to know the habits of the shooters; for others, a thorough reading of various and varied financial studies- a decision must be taken in a context of uncertainty. Thus, when a shot on goal happens, the combination of the small distance (only 11 meters from the goalkeeper) and the speed of the ball - more than 100 kilometers per hour - makes it necessary for the goalie to make an instant decision to try to prevent an opposing goal - according to the studies, the ball travels the distance in 0.2 to 0.3 seconds…and this, avoiding the «pollution» by considering a possible trajectory of the ball. The goalie must therefore decide whether to dive - or not… like a  potential investor(1) who must decide to complete a transaction (or not).

The most comprehensive academic study on the subject(2) shows us that in 94% of cases the goalkeeper dives either right or left. However, the same study mentions that 28% of shots are directed towards the center, while the goalkeeper would stay there in only 6% of cases! Why does the goalie dive almost systematically and why doesn’t the shooter target the center even more? The answer to these questions lies in what is called the “action bias”, which is defined as the belief that it would always be better to act than not. This bias encourages the goalie and attacker not to stay near the centre of the net - goalies who do not dive to the side “do not go to any trouble”; attackers who aim at the middle of the goal “do not maximise the chances on their side”.

By succumbing to the pressures (expectations of the public and their teammates) not to stand still, the goalkeeper dives and fully enters into the action bias. In the financial field, one finds this harmful trend when the investor prefers to sell his or her securities in a noisy market rather than wait the storm is over, or when he or she prefers to participate in a valuation bubble because he or she can’t resist to fashion. In terms of personal finances, the action bias pushes investors to act without patience and to carry out too many transactions, the costs of which can substantially put a strain on performance!

Emotions, a factor that weights on the sports field as well as on personal finances

The literature on goal shooting is quite dense and has also focused on emotions, through pressure(3). In this respect, the goalie’s place is more enviable because he or she is not expected to stop the shot (80% of shots on goals reach the nets).

Although the sequence of the five shots may - depending on the team starting - affect the pressure of the shooter, whose shot will either score to avoid defeat or to allow victory, it is by no means decisive for the results at the end. On the other hand, the drop in the success rate of the shooters between the first (80%) and the fifth (70%) shots testifies to the reality and the increase of the pressure over the shots. Beyond slightly lower success rates in penalty shootings to tie teams than for a simple penalty, studies indicate that only 80% of penaltys would be registered in matches - with lower rates for “superstars”, who undergo more pressure - against 90% during training.

The analogy of managing one’s personal finances is straightforward: it is easier to manage a fictitious portfolio than to tackle the real management of one’s finances, in which bets have real consequences. Decision-making on the sports field or in personal finances is marked by emotions that one must be freed of to succeed!

 

According to research(4), the performance of the national indices would be correlated with that of the country’s team: this is undoubtedly another good reason to be attentive during shots on goal!

 


(1) In this article '"investor" refers to individual client.

(2) Action bias among elite soccer goalkeepers: The case of penalty kicks, 2005 - https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/4477/1/MPRA_paper_4477.pdf

(3) Decision Under Psychological Pressure: The Shooter's Anxiety at the Penalty Kick, 2018

(4) For example: Economic impact of national sporting success: evidence from the London stock exchange, 2003 or Sports Sentiment and Stock Returns, 2007

WARNING

This document is an advertisement and has no contractual value. Its content is not intended to provide an investment service, nor does it constitute investment advice or a personalised recommendation on a financial product, nor insurance advice or a personalised recommendation, nor a solicitation of any kind, nor legal, accounting or tax advice from any entity under the responsibility of Société Générale Private Banking.

The information contained herein is provided for information purposes only, is subject to change without notice, and is intended to provide information that may be useful in making a decision. Past performance information that may be reproduced is not a guarantee of future performance.

Before subscribing to an investment service, financial product or insurance product, the potential investor (i) must read all the information contained in the detailed documentation for the service or product in question (prospectus, regulations, articles of association, key investor information document, term sheet, information notice, contractual terms and conditions, etc.), in particular those relating to the associated risks; and (ii)consult his legal and tax advisors to assess the legal consequences and tax treatment of the product or service being considered. His or her private banker is also available to provide further information, to determine with him or her whether he or she is eligible for the product or service under consideration, which may be subject to conditions, and whether it meets his or her needs. Accordingly, no entity within Société Générale Private Banking can be held responsible for any decision taken by an investor solely on the basis of the information contained in this document.

This document is confidential, intended exclusively for the person to whom it is given, and may not be communicated or brought to the attention of third parties, nor may it be reproduced in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of Société Générale Private Banking. For more information, click here.

Édouard Camblain Head of strategic projects & development