Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking ? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data ?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim ?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Covid-19 – The Policy Response Begins

This week saw a number of central banks adjust policy in light of the coronavirus epidemic and its impact on growth. Bond yields have continued to tumble lower, with 10-year US Treasuries now yielding only 78bps, down from 1.92% at the start of the year. And global equity markets remain extremely nervous and uncertain – the MSCI World index has moved by over 1.5%, in both directions, in 7 out of the past 9 trading days. What is the outlook for the global economy and markets?

This week saw a number of central banks adjust policy in light of the coronavirus epidemic and its impact on growth. Bond yields have continued to tumble lower, with 10-year US Treasuries now yielding only 78bps, down from 1.92% at the start of the year. And global equity markets remain extremely nervous and uncertain – the MSCI World index has moved by over 1.5%, in both directions, in 7 out of the past 9 trading days. What is the outlook for the global economy and markets?
In mainland China, long the epicentre of the Covid-19 epidemic, the rate of increase in new confirmed cases has slowed to a trickle in recent days, suggesting that the decision to shut down the economy for much of February has begun to bear fruit. In recent days, the government has authorised many transport links to restart and offices and factories have begun to reopen. For example, Foxconn – Apple’s key supplier – announced this week that 50% of its employees had returned to work and that it would be back at full capacity by end-March. The slump in activity was clear in February’s manufacturing purchasing manager confidence surveys. The official series – conducted by the National Bureau of Statistics with mainly large exporters – plunged to 35.7, an all-time low (the results are calibrated so that figures below 50 suggest contraction and above 50 expansion of activity). And the non-manufacturing PMI reached 29.6, as services took an even harder hit from the outbreak. March is likely to see stronger corporate confidence, with a return to more normal levels in the second quarter.
Over the past two weeks, it is the rise in cases the rest of the world which has worried policy-makers and investors. As illustrated by the left-hand chart, the rate of increase is following the same pattern as in China a few weeks ago,  suggesting that much higher numbers of new cases lie ahead. The surveys for February PMIs in Europe and the US were conducted before the recent rise in new cases, meaning that the hit to confidence from the outbreak also lies ahead, in March and at the start of the second quarter.
However, governments are following China’s playbook of measures to stem the spread – Italy for example has put several towns in quarantine, travel and large gatherings have been restricted and the country’s schools and universities will remain closed until March 15th at least. And as the virus spreads, more countries will follow suit.
In light of this, the world’s central banks have moved into action, with rate cuts this week in the US, Australia, Canada, Thailand and Malaysia. Other tools are being readied – the Bank of Japan has already resumed asset purchases and the Bank of England’s incoming governor told UK parliament this week that he stood ready to provide “supply chain financing” to smaller businesses. Obviously, such measures will do nothing to stem the spread of Covid-19, but they will help ensure smooth functioning of the financial system at a time of stress.
Governments too have eased policy. Italy has doubled its stimulus package to EUR7.5bn, US Congress has approved a $8bn spending plan while Hong Kong will distribute HKD10,000 to each resident, a move likely to be copied by Thailand. All this comes in addition to China’s regular series of targeted stimulus measures in recent weeks.

Bottom line. Although China is getting back to work, the bulk of the impact on European and US economies lies ahead. We expect the slowdown to be severe but short-lived – the combination of much more stimulative monetary and fiscal policies should help accelerate the pick-up in activity once the epidemic comes under control. Markets are likely to remain highly volatile for now and a broadly diversified allocation across more defensive assets is suggested. Gold remains our preferred diversification vehicle.

Read full article​​​​​​​

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking