Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Trending now #2

Environment, space, artificial intelligence, architecture, sport, arts, health… The main trends of the moment.
THE ARTISTIC GESTURE

Street artists inspired by the pandemic

In Bristol, Banksy’s Girl with a Pierced Eardrum was suddenly adorned with a surgical mask. In São Paulo, the Brazilian muralist Eduardo Kobra, displayed a 6 x 3 metre fresco depicting five masked children praying, in reference to the five religions, on the walls of his residence (photo). Around the world, Covid-19 continues to inspire street artists, who hijack existing works or create new takes on the global health crisis. There is a whole collective culture, made of masks, sanitiser gel, rolls of toilet paper and bottles of Corona which is being created, in the spirit of both a sense of humour and of hope.

The game

The Jigsaw Puzzle is out and proud

From six pieces to several thousand, there is something for all ages and for all tastes... With lockdown, long forgotten puzzles have been rescued from the cupboard and proudly shown off on social media. Sales have exploded so much, that online sites have had to reduce the number of days and times when orders can be placed. Beyond logistic and delivery problems, demand is such that available supplies are no longer enough. It is necessary to draw individual pieces by hand so that no two pieces are identical. The design of a new puzzle can thus take several weeks. A true game of patience for players and manufacturers alike.

The intuition

Lace to save Coral Reefs

An unusual and striking hypothesis lies at the heart of the Corail Artefact project. The artist Jérémy Gobé, on the occasion of the Clermont-Ferrand International Festival of Extraordinary Textiles, has discovered a unique application for the lace of Puy-en-Velay. Visually similar to a coral skeleton, it is a material he knows well from his artistic career. He wondered if this lace could serve as a substrate to capture coral larvae and regenerate reefs, instead of using plastic and concrete. Laboratory tests have been conclusive, and Jérémy Gobé has decided to create a project combining art, science, industry and education, to help save the Great Barrier Reef, located off the coast of Australia.

THE ARCHITECTURAL PROJECT

A "Parkipelago" in the port of Copenhagen

CPH-Ø1. It is not the brother of R2-D2 but a codename designating the first floating public space in the port of Copenhagen, a prototype launched in 2018, which won over Copenhageners and received numerous awards. Two years later, an entire forested green archipelago was built in the Danish capital. With Australian architect Marshall Blecher and designers from Danish studio Fokstrot still at the helm, the project includes a new island, itself made up of twelve small interconnected islands. This non-profit initiative aims to create a “parkipelago” accessible to fishermen, walkers, swimmers, divers... and conducive to re-wilding by birds, algae, fish and crustaceans, which find refuge and shelter there.

AI

A musical anti-plagiarism device

To avoid the myriad of plagiarism and counterfeiting lawsuits in theworld of music, the Spotify streaming platform is developing artificial intelligence capable of detecting the similarities between two songs, before they are even published. The so ware will analyse the score in real time and spot any similar segments withexisting works. Aimed at songwriters, this programme could thus prevent possible involuntary borrowing before less melodic legal issues potentially send a career out of tune.

The inner Journey

Back to basics

An egg in a nest of greenery. This is the vision of the ideal lockdown for interior designer Sybille de Margerie, who conceived this ‘luxury cocoon’ in Spring2020. For her, well-being is a luxury and this cocoon is the place to relax, curl up, and be inharmony with oneself and nature, escaping theworries of city life.

The idea of the egg is inspired by the Chinese symbol of yin and yang and plays on several oppositions: light/dark, day/night, interior/exterior and withdrawal into oneself/openness to others. Designed as an extension, the project of Sybille de Margerie is adaptable to fit in a hotel as well as a second home, and will be no doubt as appreciated outside of lockdown as well as in.

The term

Flight shame

“Flight Shame”, originally “flygskam” in Swedish, denotes the sense of shame felt when flying, due to concerns about itsenvironmental impact. This feeling of guilt is usually felt by people who are already informed and sensitive to issues surrounding the protection of the environment. Whether this feeling is followed up by individual actions or not when considering taking the plane, flight shame fits into a larger trend: the“Köpskam”, which means shame(“Skam”) of buying or consuming(“Köp”) in Swedish.

The path

Pedalling over the forest

In Belgium, an unusual cycle path has been unveiled… in the trees. Supported by architects De Gregorio & Partners, and landscape architects BuroLandschap, this project called Cycling Through The Trees has been installed in a forest in the region of Limburg. Perched 10metres above the trees, this circular cycle path o ers visitors in search of nature, 700metres of pathway through the middle of the forest and the feeling of being at one with nature. The track is very ecological in its design since it is constructed using hundreds of wooden piles rather than concrete. In addition, the trees removed for this project were replanted nearby.

The discovery

An artificial skin sensitive to pain

Researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology in Melbourne (Australia) have developed an artificial skin that responds to pain in the same way as human skin. Still in the prototype stage, the device mimics the almost instantaneous feedback response of the human body, when faced with pain sensations linked to pressure, heat or cold. This major innovation opens the way to biomedical applications such as the development of more e icient prostheses or gra s for severe burns. It could also be of interest in robotics by allowing finer tactile interactions between robots and humans.

The means of locomotion

An eletric bike inspired by the first Harley

Harley Davidson is climbing onto the electrically assisted bicycle(eBike) business by drawing on its legendary past. With its black frame, sprung leather saddle, belt drive and large white tyres, the Serial1 is very reminiscent of the Model1, the very first motorcycle from the famous Milwaukee firm, originally rolled out in 1903! Although the world’s biggest large-engine manufacturer has remained discreet about the future of this iconic prototype, it has already announced the marketing of four models of eBikes with an emphasis on urban riding: the Mosh/Cty, as well as the Rush/Cty, which will be available in three versions. These models are already available for pre-order, in Germany and the United States. Especially for those who like to ride the city in style.