Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking ? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data ?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim ?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Can finance be a partner in tackling climate change ?

The global climate is under extreme pressure. It is a context that should raise awareness and accelerate decision-making, and one in which the financial world has a key role to play.

Key report

 

Its third anniversary was on last December, but it will be many years before many more birthdays before it achieves its target to “limit global temperature rise to 1.5°C”. The Paris Climate Agreement – the first universal climate agreement adopted on conclusion of the COP21 Forum held in France at the end of 2015 – is nonetheless already delivering on its initial promises: “It has boosted responsible finance. COP21 has finally brought the stakeholders of the financial world together to address climate change”, says Dominique Blanc, Head of Research at Novethic, the Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations subsidiary that specialises in responsible investment and the accreditation of so-called SRI (Socially Responsible Investment) products.

 

The hosting of the fourth Climate Finance Day in Paris on 26 November this year reflects the commitment of the industry; a commitment that is confirmed by a number of key figures: the global green bond market (see inset below) is delivering spectacular year-on-year growth, setting a new record of $155 billion in 2017, and the British ratings agency Moody’s forecasts a figure of 250 billion for this year; that’s 60% growth. In France, there are now more than 400 SRI funds, and again the market is growing strongly*.

(*) For more details, see statistics on ISR funds compiled by Novethic : www.novethic.fr 

 

“At Societe Generale we are talking rather less about responsible finance and more about positive impact finance.”

DENIS CHILDS, Head of environmental and social consulting and positive impact finance at Societe Generale.

 

 

 

 

 

Climate finance: a key cornerstone of the COP24 action plan

One of the major successes achieved by the Paris Agreement has been the drawing in and the engagement with the banking sector, especially given the substantial need for funding: the International Energy Agency estimates that the energy sector alone will require annual investment of $3,500 billion over 30 years to keep rising temperatures to below 2°C. The OECD quotes an overall figure of $6,800 billion dollars per year. ‘Climate finance’ is also specifically referred to as one of the challenges of the ‘Katowice plan of action for a just transition’, which was adopted at last year’s COP24 in Poland. So it goes almost without saying that financial institutions are being called upon to play a crucial role in combating climate change over the coming years: “Fulfilling the Paris Agreement will require far-reaching transformational change of existing economic models and significantly reducing the carbon content of financial portfolios, which are currently very high in terms of greenhouse gas emissions. That transition will be difficult to achieve. But then, Rome wasn’t built in a day. The responsible finance market is relatively new, and its reach and depth will be greater the more it is supported by society and business...”, explains Alain Grandjean, economist and founder of Carbone 4, the specialist energy transition and climate change strategy consulting firm.

 

Encouraging the ecological transition and making it socially possible

Responsible finance: at its most basic level, this term describes the integration of ethical environmental and social challenges into the processes of financial asset management. Although the current preoccupation with climate is its main driver today, “we don’t reduce the definition of responsible finance to the low carbon transition alone”, says Denis Childs, Head of Environmental and Social Consulting and Positive Impact Finance at Societe Generale. “People talk in terms of a ‘just transition’, because although it’s about encouraging the ecological transition, that transition must also be made socially possible by supporting changes in business and management practices”, continues Dominique Blanc. ESG (Environmental, Social and Governance) criteria are therefore commonly used by the financial community to measure and assess these types of investment: “This analytical framework complements the financial analysis, without conflicting with it to provide another insight, which was not taken into account by traditional market operators until now”, continues the Head of Research at Novethic.

 

“More and more research is demonstrating that including ESG criteria as part of management can improve financial performance, especially by making it possible to take all risks fully into account.”

ALAIN GRANDJEAN, Economist and Founder of Carbone 4.

 

 

 

 

 

Financing a real and sustainable economy: that is what clients now expect

Having emerged in the 1990s alongside a few products designed to support the nascent sustainable development movement, responsible investment became progressively more mainstream as the new millennium approached. While the Global Compact launched by the United Nations in 2000 encouraged companies to adopt a more responsible attitude – structured around compliance with human rights, international employment standards, and environmental and anticorruption measures – the Equator Principles set out to improve banking industry regulation in this area. By 2003, many financial institutions had introduced rules to incorporate employment, social and environmental criteria in project funding decisions. The Equator Principles were to become a key benchmark for this responsible finance movement that expanded massively during the 2010s against the background of the climate crisis. Undoubtedly the global financial crisis of 2008 dented the confidence of the finance industry. That same industry is now anxious to move on and finance the real and sustainable economy of the future.

 

Global acceleration in sovereign green bond issues

One symbol of the increasing attractiveness of responsible finance has been the emergence of new market stakeholders who have seized on these tools and embraced this paradigm of longer-term thinking: pension funds, insurers, asset managers, etc. “ESG analysis is now being introduced more widely”, notes Dominique Blanc. Insurers have clearly identified that climate poses a significant level of financial risk to their businesses, so they are naturally open to the idea of adopting these tools”. With current funds under management of around €1,700 billion, life insurance represents a significant volume of assets for responsible finance, for example. This then is a fast-expanding market which also offers “investors the opportunity to diversify their exposure”, as Moody’s pointed out in a recent survey (9 June 2018), which was particularly optimistic about the increase seen in sovereign green bond issues worldwide. “For the issuer, they can offer benefits to new investors, in terms of easy access, as well as benefiting reputationally themselves, while the costs to be met in terms of due diligence and reporting are very low”, adds Alain Grandjean.

 

“Fulfilling the Paris Agreement will require far-reaching transformational change of existing economic models. (...) That transition will be difficult to achieve. The responsible finance market is relatively new, and its reach and depth will be greater the more it is supported by society and business...”

ALAIN GRANDJEAN, economist and founder of Carbone 4.

 

 

 

 

 

Moving from a mindset based on resources to one based on results

In practical terms, this means a complete range of products, from equities to private equity and loans, all of which are subject to the same prioritization of clear signposting and transparency. In November 2015, and then again in September 2016, Societe Generale launched two ‘positive impact’ bond issues, each of €500 million. It was a world first and it has delivered the identical results in terms of efficiency and return as traditional investments. “More and more research is demonstrating that including ESG criteria as part of management can improve financial performance, especially with regard to risk management”, affirms Alain Grandjean. “The quest for ecological performance is not incompatible with financial yield”. For Denis Childs, the problem lies in the issue that, "you have to stop seeing impact as something non-financial, when it plays a full and integral part in transitioning the economy. Especially when, in some cases, you can see that there is a direct financial value on which it is possible to structure credit”. The task now is to structure the appeal of these products, which are still largely underrepresented within portfolios at present: green bonds represent only a very marginal proportion of global bond outstandings – below 1% – despite the dynamic growth of this market. Denis Childs is calling for a complete change of perspective: “We have to move from a mindset of resources to one of results. The world of finance still revolves around investment and the resulting cash flow, but we now have to move towards the concept of impact and solutions that redefine the risk/reward ratio. It can surely be no coincidence that people at Societe Generale are talking rather less about responsible finance, and more about positive impact finance”.

 

Becoming a positive contributor to the environment

These green bonds are just the tip of the iceberg, because in reality, banks are working on their financial ‘responsibility’ approaches in a number of different ways: “There is an important need to support our clients, whether in terms of transactions specifically, or within their general area of business, but in either case, we seek to analyse the environmental and social impacts of our deals in as much detail as possible”, explains Denis Childs. Societe Generale places great importance on this type of reporting. Every year, between 100 and 200 financial opportunities are subject to this kind of detailed analysis, and the amounts involved can be in the billions of dollars”. The challenge then is to ensure that the funds released by the bank are used in accordance with the AMC (Avoid, Mitigate, Compensate) methodology. Except that this approach, which has been in place for several years now, contents itself with addressing the problem only from the flip side of the argument. “In this instance, it’s about limiting negative impacts”, continues Denis Childs. “What we want to demonstrate now is that we can also be positive contributors to the environment!” That willingness is reflected in the 2020 renewable energy funding target of €100 billion announced by Societe Generale in December 2017.

 

“COP21 has boosted responsible finance. It has brought the stakeholders of the financial world together to address climate change.”

DOMINIQUE BLANC, Head of Research at Novethic.

 

 

 

 

Green bonds: the rise of a new form of financial responsability

 

In 2007 the European Investment Bank initiated the first green bond issue. The following year, the World Bank followed suit: the Green Bond adventure had begun, and would continue to grow consistently, given a significant boost by the COP21 Climate Agreement.

A green bond works in exactly the same way as a traditional bond: the financial market stakeholder borrows from investors for a shorter or longer period in order to fund the project in return for interest on the loan. It is in the signposting of this finance where the minor revolution of green bonds is having its effect: unlike the traditional bond market, which pays little regard to how funds are invested, the prime criteria applied by green bonds are focused on ensuring that the funds generated are invested in green activities.

However, the absence of any harmonised regulatory framework can sometimes impact negatively on this nascent market. “The environmental integrity of these green bonds has yet to be guaranteed, so there is a real need to implement demanding and detailed standards”, takes up Alain Grandjean. “But this is a problem that the European Commission is now actively working on. In the meantime, the growth of this market reflects the growing awareness among financial market stakeholders of the challenges ahead”.

In 2017, green bonds with a total value of €15 billion were issued in France by a range of different entities. From the national rail operator SNCF to the energy provider ENGIE and the French Development Agency (AFD), many organisations have now taken up the challenge of issuing green bonds. And these issues have a real benefit in terms of exposure and visibility: when EDF became the first major company to launch a green bond issue in 2013, the high-profile offer allowed it to raise €1.4 billion to fund renewable energy projects.

“For EDF, a significant player in the nuclear industry it’s also a way of boosting its green credentials and promoting the diversity of its energy investments. Other companies, such as Paprec [the specialist recycling company that successfully raised up to €800 million in green bond debt this March - ed.] are also looking to raise their profile this way”, says Dominique Blanc. Underlining the emerging success of these green bonds, 2017 also saw the French State launch its first sovereign green bond, becoming the second national government in the world, after Poland, to do so.

Launched in January 2017 with an initial value of €7 billion, the total rose to €14.8 billion this summer following the issue of a fourth tranche. Figures like these underline the high level of demand from investors, together with the particularly strong predisposition of France to be pioneers on this issue, having a financial ecosystem that particularly favours green bonds. It is the leading issuer of green bonds in Europe and the world number three in the sector.

 

 

 

 

Important information

The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only and is not contractually binding. The materials contained herein are not intended to provide investment advice or any other investment service and do not constitute a personal recommendation, advice, or an offer from Societe Generale Private Banking to purchase, sell or subscribe to investment services and/or financial products and/or investments in the aforementioned asset class. Some of the products, services and solutions described can carry various risks and involve the potential loss of the entire invested amount, if not theoretically unlimited loss. As such, they are reserved for a certain category of investors and/or adapted solely for informed investors who are eligible for such products, services and solutions. The information set out above shall not be considered legal, tax or accounting advice.

The solutions mentioned on this page depend on each client’s personal situation, the legislation applying to them, and their tax residence. Accordingly, the solutions mentioned may not be available for implementation, suited to, or approved for, all Societe Generale Private Banking entities. Furthermore, access to some of these solutions is subject to specific conditions, notably in respect of eligibility.

Please contact your private banking adviser to check that these offers meet your needs and are suited to your investor profile (knowledge, experience in investment, financial situation, including ability to withstand losses, and investment objectives, including risk tolerance).

Societe Generale Private Banking shall under no circumstances be held liable for any decision taken by a reader on the basis of this information. Before Societe Generale Private Banking can provide a potential investor with an investment service and/or a subscription to financial products, the investor must first be made aware of, understand and sign the related informative and contractual documentation, notably in respect of the associated risks. The potential investor must not base his/her investment decision and/or give investment instructions solely on the basis of this document.

All Societe Generale Private Banking entities reserve the right not to update or amend this document and shall accept no liability in this regard. The present document has the sole aim of informing investors, who will make their investment decisions without overly relying on this publication. The Societe Generale Private Banking entities shall under no circumstances be held liable for the accuracy, relevance or exhaustiveness of this information. The Societe Generale Private Banking entities give no explicit or implicit guarantees as to the accuracy or exhaustiveness of this information or of the profitability or performance of any asset class, country or market.

This document is not intended as a list or summary of all the terms and conditions pertaining to financial products, nor to identify all or some of the risks that may be associated with the aforementioned product.

The historical data and the information and opinions herein have been obtained from, or are based upon, external sources that Societe Generale Private Banking entities believe to be reliable but have not been independently verified. The Societe Generale Private Banking entities shall under no circumstances be liable for the accuracy, relevance or exhaustiveness of this information. Information provided on past performance, even repeated performances, is in no way a guarantee of future performance and may not be repeated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and the value of investments may fluctuate. These forecasts about future performances are based on assumptions which may not be realised and do not therefore provide any assurance or guarantee with regard to the expected results of the investments in the aforementioned asset classes.