Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking ? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data ?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim ?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Education: the most powerful weapon

The UN ranks education as a key objective among the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) of its 2030 Agenda – “Ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”.

In a nutshell

 

Education enables underprivileged members of society to break out of the cycle of poverty. It is also key to giving workers the skills to cope with nature of work in the 21st Century.

The United Nations (UN) has identified improvement in access to education as one of important ways to achieve its long-term SDG objectives. It estimates that education generates a very high return on investment –10-15$ returned for every 1$ invested. According to UNESCO data however, 263 million children are not in schooling and 758 million youths and adults are illiterate. The problem is particularly acute for girls and women. Achieving the UN goal of universal primary and secondary education by 2030 will represent an insurmountable challenge for many countries.

To meet this challenge, the UN recognizes the importance of encouraging the private sector to invest resources in the development of educational tools and facilities. However, the investment required is massive – in its recent Learning Generation report, the global Education Commission estimated that it will require boosting spending on education from $1.2 trillion per year today to $3 trillion by 2030 (at today’s prices) across all low- and middle-income countries. While much will come from state budgets and multi-lateral organisations, private-sector initiatives will be essential.

Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world, Nelson Mandela.

The developed world faces very different but equally acute educational problems. The futurist Thomas Frey has estimated that up to 2 billion jobs could be at risk from automation and robotics by 2030. While such estimates are pure conjecture, it seems clear that very different skills will be needed to succeed in rapidly changing workplaces. And that the pace of change will require constant retraining throughout workers’ careers. Already, some 40 percent of employers globally say they find it difficult to recruit people with the skills they need.

As we have highlighted in recent quarters, productivity measures have been falling across the world. Part of the answer is investment in physical capital, but a large part will have to be investment in human capital via education.

What are the opportunities for companies ?

 

Much of the growth is coming in educational technology (EdTech) which EdTechxGlobal estimates will expand by 17% per annum by 2020. This ranges from hardware devices – routers and networks, tablets and computers – to content and software, such as in massive open online courses or MOOCs. The combination offers the potential to give access to the world’s top educators in some of its most remote locations. Yet according to Citi, only 2% of the USD5 trillion market in education is digitised today.

But opportunities also exist for private schools and universities, particularly those focusing on the key kindergarten to twelfth-grade segment (K-12) in large education-hungry countries like China, India and Brazil. For companies building and operating student residences and housing. And indeed for traditional publishers and suppliers of textbooks and educational materials.